Posts Tagged ‘Cody Rhodes’

Source: Ring of Honor

Brandi Rhodes spoke with Ring of Honor on a number of wrestling topics. Here are some of the highlights:

Having more to prove in the ring as Cody Rhodes’ wife and initially being known as a ring announcer:

“I absolutely have more to prove than anybody who steps foot in that ring. I’ve had a target on my back since the second I opened my mouth and said that I want to do more. People these days don’t really like that. It’s kind of ‘stay in your role.’ I don’t have a role. I’m not very good at staying in my lane, and I’m not confined to any role or by any rules. So, naturally, there’s always going to be a target on my back. Everybody’s going to look for any mistake they can find whether it’s in the ring or outside the ring. My job is to stay focused on what I’m trying to do. There will be haters along the way and there will be fans along the way. I am definitely very aware that I’m somebody who’s always got a target on them.”

Cody’s initial reaction to Brandi wanting to wrestling:

“His reaction was, ‘I think you should absolutely go for it if this is what you want to do.’ He said I just need to put 100 percent into it because wrestling is one of those things that you can’t do 50 percent. He’s very much been focused on making sure I put forth the same effort I did at the beginning all the way through, making sure there’s no point at which I get lazy or overconfident or don’t want to go in and train. I doubt that will ever happen with me because I’ve always been a student of whatever sport I’m in, but it’s nice to have him there to keep me fully focused.”

Her first attempt at training to wrestle and ring announcing in WWE:

“I was at first, but then I wasn’t. Part of the reason I left the first time is because I was a little down-hearted that I wasn’t getting to wrestle, and I wasn’t getting to announce in a very big role either. After Cody and I got married, that’s when I decided I wanted to go back and I only want to do the wrestling. We tried, and that worked for a while, but then it ended up being a situation where it made the most sense to take the path they were familiar with first to ty to get to the path they were unfamiliar with. So I went back on the road to announce and get in front of them again so that they could think, ‘Oh, yeah, we remember Brandi, we like Brandi. Let’s think about her in these other roles.’ But it turned into, ‘We really like her in this role. We can’t see her in any other role. We don’t even want to hear it.’ So then it was like, ‘We don’t want her training because we can’t have her hurt herself and miss shows. And we don’t want her to mess her face up.’ But sometimes you just have to listen to your heart, and my heart was saying that I need to do more, I’m not happy with this. Life is short. I can’t just do a job I’m not happy with. I’m happy that I made the choice to branch out and take a bit of a risk.”

You can read the full interview by clicking here.

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Source: Buffalo News

Cody Rhodes spoke with Buffalo News on a number of wrestling topics. Here are some of the highlights:

Leaving WWE as they hire more and more indie wrestlers:

“It’s definitely the road less traveled that I’m on, but there more people navigating it like I am. I could be totally wrong, but I feel a lot like I did in 1996 and ’97 as a fan, when my family’s business was getting ready to be the coolest thing. The next thing I know, I went from being the only wrestling fan in my class to having Nitro parties and the Monday Night War. I feel like we’re on the cusp of entering a really, unbelievably good era for our industry fans and competitors alike. Financially of course, but for fans, there’s variety. You can go onto New Japan World and there’s English commentary primed and ready. The Fite app is primed and ready for Ring of Honor. The WWE Network is primed and ready. It’s whatever you choose.”

Memories of his Battleground 2013 match with Goldust (and Dusty Rhodes at ringside):

“Going into it, I felt completely different than when I was coming out of it. There was a lot of high stress at the time. It was almost uncomfortable, because I was working really hard to garner my own spotlight and getting away from the family. But then, obviously, it became a magical moment. It’s a great learning experience when you’re busting it for 20 minutes, and then my dad just does the elbow. That was the thing that got the people to stand up for the remainder of the match. Grab an apple, because you’re going to school. It was really special, and looking back on it, it’s a tremendous memory. Our family looks at it as Dusty’s last stand. He could barely get up the steps, but on that night, it didn’t matter. There are so many great things about Buffalo, but honestly, that one will always jump to number one.”

You can read the full interview by clicking here.

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WWE producer and creative team member Michael Hayes extended an invitation towards Cody Rhodes on Twitter to appear at 25 November’s revived Starrcade show.

It was announced yesterday that WWE are bringing back the famous NWA/WCW event in a house show format, and Hayes wants Cody to make a brief WWE return so he can appear on the card. This stemmed from Cody tweeting Hayes to suggest he ensures Goldust is on the show, because it’d mean a lot to the Rhodes family.

Starrcade was the creation of Dusty Rhodes way back in 1983, so it would make sense to have some Rhodes family influence involved. Hayes replied with his own suggestion that Cody make a WWE comeback and team with his brother at Starrcade.

If this happens, it’d mark Cody’s first WWE showing since departing the company in May, 2016. Further, it’s likely he wouldn’t be held down by the dreadful Stardust gimmick that derailed his career and would simply appear as himself.

Cody got the ball rolling by tweeting Hayes, and it now looks possible that we could see a Rhodes family reunion in WWE to honour Dusty.

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Source: CBS Local Sports

Brandi Rhodes spoke with CBS Local Sports on a number of wrestling topics. Here are some of the highlights:

Leaving GFW:

“Unfortunately, that story is kind of a mess. There are some valid statements that I’ve seen, but it’s really not as dramatic as people want it to be. Basically, Cody and I were very candid with what we were doing after WWE as far as contracts go. People are confused. I never signed the contract that people think I signed with Global Force stating that they got percentages. What I did sign was a tentative contract with Impact Wrestling when they were still Impact. That contract had a clause for me, because I was already working on some stuff in other areas of television. That clause basically said that if something else in television were to happen for me, they can’t be uncooperative. And if they were uncooperative, we would be able to part ways. And that is honestly what happened. So, I am filming something awesome in Atlanta, but I can’t say what it is.”

If there were missed opportunities during her time in WWE:

“Yes, and no. I really enjoyed ring announcing and had a lot of fun with that. I had many different ways to challenge myself with that and make it fun and interesting. But when you’ve been an athlete and used to being a physical person, sometimes that takes over. And you’re kind of like, ‘Okay, when am I going to get my chance to do my thing?’ While I was announcing I was the same person I am now, who was in the gym, eating right and doing all of these things. Being physical [is] something I’ve always done. I figure skated for 17 years on a highly competitive level. So, sitting down and watching other people compete is a difficult thing for me. …I felt like there was potential for more, and I did try. People have seen some of the backstage shoots with myself and Cody doing these different characters. It would have been so much fun. Just not being able to get there got a little frustrating. Being able to do all of the stuff now, it’s so much fun and confirms for me I was able to do more, and I was ready to do more.”

Tribute to Dusty Rhodes in her ROH debut:

“When people want to honor other people, it’s a wonderful thing. But there are a lot of factors that you have to take into consideration when you do that. A lot of time it’s the families of those people. How do they feel about it, how are they dealing with things and what does it mean to them? It took me awhile to do this, even though I am family. It took me some time to decide that I was ready to wear the polka dots. I wanted to make sure it was going to be a match that meant something. For me, stepping into a Ring of Honor ring was going to be the biggest match I ever had. So, I wanted to commemorate that in a great way, and the best way I could think to do that was to wear these polka dots. That was for me and for Cody. It was an emotional thing. But I was so shocked at how well received it was. It was like they were waiting for it. I’m so glad I was able to do that and people can appreciate it. It encourages people to then be more open about their feelings about things and say, ‘Hey, I was the biggest fan of Dusty, and I got to meet him one time.’ I love hearing things like that. It was really cool for me. It’s something I will continue to do sparingly. I’m a fashionista, I have a lot of ring gear and different looks I’m going to be trying. But those will definitely be around for some time.”

You can read the full interview by clicking here.

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Cody Rhodes told FOX Sports that CM Punk’s infamous ‘Pipe Bomb Promo’ from the Summer of 2011 helped change the pro wrestling industry for good.

When asked about his recent success outside of the WWE bubble, Rhodes claimed it could be traced back to Punk’s words on the June 27, 2011 episode of Monday Night Raw and said promotions like Ring Of Honor have directly benefitted from the exposure ever since.

Back in 2011, Punk mentioned ROH, New Japan Pro Wrestling and even said hello to good friend Colt Cabana during his tirade. To Rhodes, that helped put ROH on the map to a whole new level of wrestling fans, ones who possibly didn’t even know the company existed beforehand.

As the current ROH World Champion, Cody has had sterling matches in other organisations like NJPW and WCPW (where he also reigned as WCPW Internet Champion) since leaving WWE. Now a free agent able to pick and choose his own dates, Rhodes believes Punk directly talking about ROH and the fact there are alternatives to WWE has opened up the wrestling world permanently.

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Source: Channel Guide Magazine

Cody Rhodes spoke with Channel Guide Magazine on a number of wrestling topics. Here are some of the highlights:

The success of Bullet Club:

“Bullet Club has become even more worldwide. It was already worldwide with Finn [Bálor] and AJ Styles, Bullet Club OG’s Karl Anderson and Gallows. They set the playing field. Now to walk out on it and it really is worldwide. The addition of Marty Scurll is very significant. I don’t know if people are giving him the credit they should. He represents an entirely different demographic.”

No plans to come back to WWE:

“I don’t want to sound negative but being part of history right now and this new era and new boom. I didn’t get that while in WWE. So currently there is no incentive for me to return to WWE. I’m making more money than I was with WWE. I’ve been in some unbelievable matchups. Two are coming up. I love WWE. Just currently there is no incentive. There are some things I would love to be a part of. I would love to be part of the Dusty tag team tournament. At the same time I don’t think I’m playing a revenge song here. I don’t think I’m ready to move out of the spot of where I’m at.”

Shawn Michaels’ advice:

“Shawn Michaels told me once that when someone asked, ‘Hey, how was my match?’ He answered them, but then said to me, ‘You know how your match was when you walk through the curtain. You know if it was awesome or if it wasn’t. You know because of how the audience reacted.’ It’s more about asking what you could have done differently. It’s made me really happy to play my music, my way.”

Cody Rhodes also discussed New Japan Pro Wrestling. You can read the full interview by clicking here.

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Source: Collider

Cody Rhodes recently sat down with Collider to discuss his recent appearance on the CW’s Arrow, what it was like preparing for his character, the show giving a nod to his former Stardust persona, and more. Below are some highlights of that interview.

It’s so exciting that you’re on this week’s Arrow!

“I’m jazzed about it, man! I’m giddy over it!”

Whose idea was it to have the nod to your WWE persona with the name of the drug being Stardust?

“I believe it was Marc Guggenheim. Actually, I think everybody agreed that there would be some sort of a wink to the audience who enjoyed the initial interaction with Stardust and the Arrow at WWE’s SummerSlam. It concerned me a little bit because there are tons of Arrow fans who do not like wrestling, or maybe they’re not aware of it and they don’t intend to be aware of it. So, the last thing I wanted to do was make it so obvious that it was, “Here’s the dumb wrestler who gives a dumb wrestler performance. Bye dumb wrestler!” But when I saw it all together, it’s just simply a good wink at the audience and, in a way, it bridges the experience from the wrestling that Stephen and I did to being on set. When I did the character of Stardust, for me to play the character, I had to give myself something in my mind for why, in eight years of being Cody Rhodes and myself, I would want to be Stardust. I always thought of it as some sort of drug or brainwashing, so it’s perfect. I think it bridges the experiences.”

I recently spoke to Rick Gonzalez (who plays Wild Dog) about working with you and he said you really killed this role and that you had a certain energy about what you wanted to do with this character. How did you prepare for this and were there things you specifically wanted to bring to this character?

“I’m so happy to hear that Rick Gonzalez said nice things about me. A couple mornings on the way to the side were hour-long drives and all we talked about was fast food ’cause he were both on a diet. Stephen is ripped, so everybody has gotta be ripped, so we couldn’t eat anything we wanted. So, all we had were these food orgy discussions. But to prepare, it was easier to plug into being a villain because that’s what I’m used to. I didn’t want to be over the top, especially coming from wrestling where everything is over the top. I wanted to provide some nuance to it. It might look over the top, but I wanted to actually be connected to it. I had a really brief experience in L.A. – and I’m not going to pretend that it was long – when I was a teenager and I attended the Howard Fine Acting Studio. Howard Fine is an amazing teacher, and he’s always stayed in touch with me. Even with wrestling, he’s helped me, and he was the first person I mentioned this to. Even if the character is something that seems ridiculous on paper, there’s a human element to everything. Otherwise, we don’t connect with it. So, even in these brief scenes, that was the goal with everyone. I can look like an absolute zombie drug dealer/killer, but I wanted to add some humanity to it.”