Posts Tagged ‘Cody Rhodes’

Tenille Dashwood recently spoke with Scott Fishman for TV Insider; you can read a few highlights below:

Tenille Dashwood comments on her current run with Ring Of Honor: 

“I feel revived and alive again with wrestling. I started this because I love wrestling. Back when I was younger in Australia, I wanted to be a wrestler and loved what I did with WWE.

“It’s completely different now. It’s not five minutes on TV where I’m asked to do such and such. It’s having competitive singles matches every night. There are different opponents every night. I’m meeting new people and improving my own skills every time by working with different people in the ring. It got me going again.”

Tenille reveals advice Cody Rhodes has given her: 

“We talked about how to go about things and make sure I enjoy it and taking advantage of the opportunities I have now. Just to do the things I haven’t been able to do in years.

With WWE you don’t always get to do things the way you like to do them, so now he said to remember that I’m in control and can do things my way. To be doing things for a reason and to wrestle around the world. And not to do it for job, but to do it because you love and enjoy it and travel and meet people and wrestle. It was to remember all that.”

Dashwood comments on The IIconics’ Smackdown debut: 

“I kind of knew it was coming, but I told them not to tell me if it’s happening because I wanted to be in the moment. I called Peyton out. I called her a liar. I said, ‘You’re not at home right now.’ She was like, ‘Oops you got me.’ I said, ‘No, don’t tell me!’ I have been friends with those girls for years.

“I just talked to the girls yesterday. They are on the European tour right now. We always catch up. We stay in contact. They come over my house, and we go into the hot tub. We’re good friends. I’m so excited for them. Seeing them really warms my heart doing what they love. I know what it feels like to have those big moments and that feeling. So, I’m happy for them.”

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Speculation is mounting that CM Punk is preparing to make his long-awaited wrestling return at September’s historic All In show.

The former WWE star, currently competing in UFC, will be in Illinois for a meet-and-greet the same week that Cody Rhodes and co. head to Hoffman Estates, a suburb of Chicago.

While his attendance has not been formally announced by the event’s organisers, Rhodes strongly hinted that he would be involved in some capacity during a press conference yesterday. “I can confirm he will be here the day before, as part of All In weekend,” he said. “He’s in town, but we literally can say nothing.”

Punk has been in self-imposed wrestling exile for the last four years, having departed WWE in 2014 amid differences with management. The fall-out – taking the form of an ongoing lawsuit with in-house doctor Chris Amann – is still ongoing. The 39-year-old claimed in subsequent interviews that he was now “retired” from the business.

With or without the ex-ROH World Champion, All In already looks set to be a roaring success. Originally conceived as a wager with the Wrestling Observer’s Dave Meltzer – who dismissed the idea of an independent show drawing 10,000 spectators – tickets sold out in just 30 minutes after going on sale Sunday afternoon. Get your wallet on the table, Big Dave.

Cody Rhodes was interviewed by FOX Sports to discuss his success in Japan and WWE tenure. Rhodes ended his WWE career in 2016, after the conclusion of his tenure having a run as Stardust. The Stardust character was formed following Cody and Goldust experiencing a losing streak after a successful tag team run, and Cody admonishing his brother to find another tag team partner. Goldust would team with a list of people, but would eventually team with his brother again under the Stardust character.

The two turned heel against the Usos, and won the WWE Tag Team Championships again. After dissension between the two, Stardust turned on his brother and commenced a singles career. While Stardust had moments such as teaming with The Ascension as the Cosmic Wasteland, competing in the ladder match at WrestleMania 31 for the Intercontinental Championship, competing against John Cena for the United States Championship, and feuding with Stephen Amell, he never peaked past a midcard level.

Regarding never reaching a main event status, Cody defended WWE by admitting that an opportunity was presented.

“In WWE, you’re always given the opportunity,” said Cody. “They have such a large brand — you’re on the (WWE) Network, you’re on YouTube, you’re on USA Network, you’re on so many platforms. I just think it didn’t feel right. I don’t know what specifically.”

Rhodes expressed to FOX Sports how the Stardust character affected his departure from WWE.

“Maybe I just wasn’t meant to do Stardust as long as I had done it, so it didn’t feel right. I remember putting some concept art together for what I would look like as just Cody Rhodes, as just Cody, the wrestler,” said Cody. “And it really just appealed to me in such a way that if I couldn’t do it in WWE, I thought well, I’ve saved my money, I know a little bit about the game, I’m going to go and do it on my own and see how I do. And it ended up being the best decision I’ve ever made.”

Now, Cody has spent his time competing in the independent circuit, as well as Ring of Honor, New Japan, and briefly Impact Wrestling. He won the Ring of Honor World Championship and held it for six months before losing it to Dalton Castle last December. He explained that he is experiencing a significant level of freedom being able to compete in different promotions.

“It’s total freedom. And I don’t think it’s fear. I don’t think that New Japan and Ring of Honor are afraid of the Bullet Club, they’re aware,” said Rhodes. “Particularly Being the Elite — they’re aware that it’s only a good thing, because it’s a platform for talent to succeed.”

Cody revealed to FOX Sports that the popular “Being the Elite” YouTube series is currently in discussions with a number of companies interested in purchasing the show’s streaming rights. He also explained why the rift in Bullet Club occurred between him and Kenny Omega.

“I’m not capable of being in a group where I’m not the leader. I did it once earlier in my career with Legacy, and that was cool because I was young and green and a rookie in the industry, but now no more,” expressed Cody. “After a world title run you can’t really call someone else your leader. And I think that is this natural tension, that very really exists, because here [Omega] is with this reputation of being the best wrestler in the world and here I am with that mainstream appeal that helped gain a bunch of new fans for the Bullet Club. And the fact that I think Matt likes me more, and Nick likes Kenny, it’s all real. So why not have a match? Why not make it real?”

Cody will be facing Kenny Omega at Ring of Honor’s Supercard of Honor pay-per-view on April 7th in New Orleans.

Brandi Rhodes was recently interviewed by WrestlingInc.com owner Raj Giri to talk about joining the cast of WAGS Atlanta. During the interview, she discussed how the current political climate has affected professional wrestling.

 Last month, Rhodes’ husband and current Ring of Honor world champion Cody Rhodes recounted a time where he told a fan to remove the Confederate flag from his profile picture on Twitter, who obliged. Brandi was asked if the business and its fans have gotten better about racism with the current state of politics in America.

“I honestly don’t correlate any of it to the political climate and anything that is happening right now,” she said. “I think people are just going to be people, and racism is a thing. If people have an inclination to be racist then they are going to be, and there is not a whole lot that you can do about it. The very positive moment that was posted on Social Media with Cody being from the South and, you know, in the South, a lot of things that are said where Northerners wouldn’t allow for the things to be said, and things like that. He has a fixation on that flag, and it is something that he will not tolerate. He just happened to say something to the guy about it. The guy came up to him and said that he is a big fan, and Cody said, well, you know, thank you, but it’s time to change that picture. The guy said, you know what? You are absolutely right, and it couldn’t have worked out any better than that. That is wonderful, and I think in that case, it was someone who wasn’t meaning to portray a racist message.

“Some people don’t know why they have pride in something that they do,” she continued. “Maybe it is family upbringing, and different things that they thought was tradition, but then they look at it on the flip side and realize how someone can see how somebody would say that it isn’t a good idea, and they change, or they stick to their guns. Either way, hey, you know, people are free to be who they want to be so you can’t change everybody, but it was nice in that situation that individual had a change of heart.”

As far as racism in wrestling, Rhodes said the business has always been known to push the boundaries of political correctness going all the way back to the Attitude Era. But she said she has never been confronted with outright racism during her time in the business. Her past experiences as a figure skater have shown her what institutional racism really is, and she hasn’t gone through that in wrestling.

“I grew up figure skating, and in figure skating there is only a handful of black people at the time figure skating with me. It was a lot of things that you can see easily. Being put at the very bottom of the list with around 20 girls when I was the only one who didn’t fall, like come on, but in wrestling, it’s not something that I have seen on the surface like that,” she said. “You talk about politically correct and all of that, wrestling has always been known to have an edge to it, so even in the Attitude Era, where people speak so fondly of, there was always that edge to wrestling that we don’t acknowledge now.

“For instance, when I was in college, I was shown in a women’s studies class of a Bra & Panties match where women were barking like dogs and getting on their knees for men, and in that class, it was highly shunned. They were talking about how this was terrible, and how they couldn’t believe it was happening, but at the end of the day it was entertainment and it wasn’t meant to do anything other than that. Wrestling has always been on that edge of a cliff in many areas as far as what is politically correct and not. I guess it all depends on how people view it, but wrestling continues to skyrocket and become so popular. I think every case, as they come, we will have to see, but for me personally I haven’t seen anything personally like I felt during my figure skating days.”

Rhodes will appear on the upcoming season of WAGS Atlanta, which premieres on E! on Wednesday, January 3 at 10 p.m. ET.

Source: Ring of Honor

Brandi Rhodes spoke with Ring of Honor on a number of wrestling topics. Here are some of the highlights:

Having more to prove in the ring as Cody Rhodes’ wife and initially being known as a ring announcer:

“I absolutely have more to prove than anybody who steps foot in that ring. I’ve had a target on my back since the second I opened my mouth and said that I want to do more. People these days don’t really like that. It’s kind of ‘stay in your role.’ I don’t have a role. I’m not very good at staying in my lane, and I’m not confined to any role or by any rules. So, naturally, there’s always going to be a target on my back. Everybody’s going to look for any mistake they can find whether it’s in the ring or outside the ring. My job is to stay focused on what I’m trying to do. There will be haters along the way and there will be fans along the way. I am definitely very aware that I’m somebody who’s always got a target on them.”

Cody’s initial reaction to Brandi wanting to wrestling:

“His reaction was, ‘I think you should absolutely go for it if this is what you want to do.’ He said I just need to put 100 percent into it because wrestling is one of those things that you can’t do 50 percent. He’s very much been focused on making sure I put forth the same effort I did at the beginning all the way through, making sure there’s no point at which I get lazy or overconfident or don’t want to go in and train. I doubt that will ever happen with me because I’ve always been a student of whatever sport I’m in, but it’s nice to have him there to keep me fully focused.”

Her first attempt at training to wrestle and ring announcing in WWE:

“I was at first, but then I wasn’t. Part of the reason I left the first time is because I was a little down-hearted that I wasn’t getting to wrestle, and I wasn’t getting to announce in a very big role either. After Cody and I got married, that’s when I decided I wanted to go back and I only want to do the wrestling. We tried, and that worked for a while, but then it ended up being a situation where it made the most sense to take the path they were familiar with first to ty to get to the path they were unfamiliar with. So I went back on the road to announce and get in front of them again so that they could think, ‘Oh, yeah, we remember Brandi, we like Brandi. Let’s think about her in these other roles.’ But it turned into, ‘We really like her in this role. We can’t see her in any other role. We don’t even want to hear it.’ So then it was like, ‘We don’t want her training because we can’t have her hurt herself and miss shows. And we don’t want her to mess her face up.’ But sometimes you just have to listen to your heart, and my heart was saying that I need to do more, I’m not happy with this. Life is short. I can’t just do a job I’m not happy with. I’m happy that I made the choice to branch out and take a bit of a risk.”

You can read the full interview by clicking here.

Source: Buffalo News

Cody Rhodes spoke with Buffalo News on a number of wrestling topics. Here are some of the highlights:

Leaving WWE as they hire more and more indie wrestlers:

“It’s definitely the road less traveled that I’m on, but there more people navigating it like I am. I could be totally wrong, but I feel a lot like I did in 1996 and ’97 as a fan, when my family’s business was getting ready to be the coolest thing. The next thing I know, I went from being the only wrestling fan in my class to having Nitro parties and the Monday Night War. I feel like we’re on the cusp of entering a really, unbelievably good era for our industry fans and competitors alike. Financially of course, but for fans, there’s variety. You can go onto New Japan World and there’s English commentary primed and ready. The Fite app is primed and ready for Ring of Honor. The WWE Network is primed and ready. It’s whatever you choose.”

Memories of his Battleground 2013 match with Goldust (and Dusty Rhodes at ringside):

“Going into it, I felt completely different than when I was coming out of it. There was a lot of high stress at the time. It was almost uncomfortable, because I was working really hard to garner my own spotlight and getting away from the family. But then, obviously, it became a magical moment. It’s a great learning experience when you’re busting it for 20 minutes, and then my dad just does the elbow. That was the thing that got the people to stand up for the remainder of the match. Grab an apple, because you’re going to school. It was really special, and looking back on it, it’s a tremendous memory. Our family looks at it as Dusty’s last stand. He could barely get up the steps, but on that night, it didn’t matter. There are so many great things about Buffalo, but honestly, that one will always jump to number one.”

You can read the full interview by clicking here.

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WWE producer and creative team member Michael Hayes extended an invitation towards Cody Rhodes on Twitter to appear at 25 November’s revived Starrcade show.

It was announced yesterday that WWE are bringing back the famous NWA/WCW event in a house show format, and Hayes wants Cody to make a brief WWE return so he can appear on the card. This stemmed from Cody tweeting Hayes to suggest he ensures Goldust is on the show, because it’d mean a lot to the Rhodes family.

Starrcade was the creation of Dusty Rhodes way back in 1983, so it would make sense to have some Rhodes family influence involved. Hayes replied with his own suggestion that Cody make a WWE comeback and team with his brother at Starrcade.

If this happens, it’d mark Cody’s first WWE showing since departing the company in May, 2016. Further, it’s likely he wouldn’t be held down by the dreadful Stardust gimmick that derailed his career and would simply appear as himself.

Cody got the ball rolling by tweeting Hayes, and it now looks possible that we could see a Rhodes family reunion in WWE to honour Dusty.