Posts Tagged ‘Legacy’

The first World Heavyweight Championship run of CM Punk’s career came to an abrupt end at Unforgiven 2008 when he was attacked backstage by Randy Ortonand Legacy. On a recent episode of Something To Wrestle with Bruce Prichard, the former WWE producer recapped the pay-per-view and shed some light on the situation.

Punk won the world heavyweight title by cashing in his Money In The Bankbriefcase during an episode of RAW. Prichard revealed that the reason WWE put the title on him was because of injuries to top stars John Cena and Randy Orton. Despite not being considered a top star by many backstage officials, Punk had a dedicated fan base that mostly consisted of the younger audience and WWE figured it was the right time to give him a run with the title.

“CM Punk was somebody who was on the rise, and someone from the television studios – which is a much younger group of guys – really liked CM Punk for whatever reason,” Prichard said. “If you were to ask someone like me or Vince McMahon or Michael Hayes what the appeal was to CM Punk, we couldn’t tell you.

“It was until I took him up and sat him down and you actually take the time to know someone. John Cena is out, Randy Orton is out, all these guys are out. You have to make the move. It forces you to pull the trigger to make the move and pull the trigger, and with CM Punk we did that. We felt that this was his opportunity where one door shuts and the opportunity comes your way to make the most out of it. We went with CM Punk during that time, which was all there was to it. It wasn’t much more thought other than necessity that we lost all of those guys at once due to injuries that we had to put somebody else in there, you have to play the game and you needed players which were how CM Punk originally got in there. From my vantage point, and me speaking my opinion, I thought CM Punk deserved it and I thought that Punk would do well in that role.”

Punk was expected to defend his title in a Championship Scramble match during the main event of Unforgiven. However, the backstage assault that included Orton punting Punk in the face rendered him unable to compete in the match, and he was forced to forfeit his championship. Chris Jericho eventually won the title, and Prichard said it was because the WWE wanted to raise the stakes of his rivalry with Shawn Michaels. Prichard said it was a clear mistake to take the title off of Punk at the time because he needed it to elevate his status. Prichard revealed that Punk was not happy about the situation.

“CM Punk was confused. Really confused, and when you look back, to me [Chris] Jericho and Shawn [Michaels] did not need that title. They needed a prop for a ladder match, okay, but they sure as hell didn’t need the championship. I thought CM Punk needed the championship. I thought that the championship helped Punk, but at that point, it was needed for a prop to have a ladder match so as crazy and as many conspiracy theories people want to throw out there it is as simple as that,” Prichard said. “It sucked, and you can see, hindsight being 20/20 you see the interview with CM Punk where they [Legacy] jump him and Punk is not even into it. He’s frustrated and probably upset, all rightfully so by the way, so you feel before he even gets jumped he’s thinking, okay fine, I’m going to do this f**k it. It did suck because it made no sense.”

Advertisements

Source: Wrestlinginc.com

Impact Wrestling superstar Tessa Blanchard recently spoke with Wrestling Inc. president Raj Giri. As the daughter of wrestling legend Tully Blanchard, Tessa was asked about her experiences growing up in a wrestling household. Blanchard told Giri that her father retired before she was born, but she did see him wrestle once and admitted it was a scary experience. She also had the opportunity to meet other wrestlers when she attended WWE shows.

“Well, I’m 22 years old now. My dad was out of wrestling before I was even born. Then, when I was younger my dad had come out of retirement so I was present for one of his matches. We were in New Bern, North Carolina, and I don’t even remember how old I was, but I was a little girl,” Blanchard said. “I remember being scared because my dad had bled in that match and that was my first–I think that was my first experience to see my dad in the ring, which scared me considering I was a little girl, but I also remember going backstage to a RAW and SmackDown meeting Hulk Hogan and Triple H. I didn’t really understand because I was so young, but looking back now, those were amazing memories.”

Blanchard revealed that she initially didn’t tell her father or any of her family that she planned on pursuing a professional wrestling career. She was estranged from them at the time and admits that she wasn’t in a good place in her life. Finding a wrestling school to join was her outlet, and she instantly fell in love. Her stepfather Magnum T.A. was the first to see her wrestle and he gave her advice that she still follows to this day.

“I actually got into pro wrestling without even telling my dad or anyone in my family for that matter. It was probably around 2012, the year that my dad was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame. I think that trip to Miami, Florida planted the seed that perhaps this is the thing that I wanted to do. My brothers and sisters all went to Miami with my dad, but they were all interested in checking out the beaches, or cool restaurants, but I was like, Dad, can I wake up at 5 a.m. and go check out WWE Axxess with you? That stuff intrigued me and being around people that work for WWE at the time, and being around people who are part of the roster, just being exposed to that was very unique for me. That was the trip that planted the seed,” Blanchard said. “Fast forward to when I turned 18 and I got kicked out of my house and I lived on my own for a year and during that year I didn’t speak to my family too often – in fact, I did not speak to them at all. I was probably heading down to a not-so-awesome path. I remember waking up and I asked myself what I was doing. I don’t know what it was exactly, I don’t really remember but something made me look up a wrestling school. I found out that Highspots was about 20-25 minutes to where I was living at the time. I went there and spoke with the owner of Highspots, and I told them that I wanted to be a pro wrestler. They had me watch a training that day with Cedric Alexander and George South were all in the ring, and they ended up pulling me into the ring and had me run the ropes and taking bumps. I remember it hurt so bad but I loved it, I loved it so much.

“I remember it was like three or four months in they came back and said that I couldn’t train here anymore because I know who your dad is and that he doesn’t know you were training,” she continued. “I didn’t want him to think that we were hiding something from him, so I was like, no, I will handle it, don’t worry about it. I remember calling my dad and my stepdad [Magnum T.A.]. I remember telling my step-dad because he lived in Charlotte, North Carolina–well, they still live there, but I told him, ‘hey, I am training to wrestle. It’s about 20 minutes to where you guys live and I wanted him to come and check it out.’ That week he didn’t come, but the week after that he did, and I got super excited to when he came in, as well as my brother. I told Cedric [Alexander] that let’s do our thing, to get in the ring and train and to do our spots. I remember my step-dad coming through the turnbuckle and we were talking for a moment; he was like, ‘Okay Tessa, you are not good, but you have got it. You just have to go out there and become undeniable.’ That is where my #Undeniable hashtag came along, but also that was how I told my family that I was wrestling.”

Giri also asked Blanchard about whether coming from such a rich wrestling pedigree raises expectations for her. She explained that while she embraces the pressure of living up to her family name, she also wants create her own legacy.

“Yes and no. I always say that it is a blessing and a curse. I am very–I feel very honored and blessed to carry on our family name and legacy in the business, but also, I want to forge my own path at the same time,” she said. “I always say, it does add pressure and that extra weight on my shoulders to be the best to do my grandpa [Joe Blanchard], my dad and stepdad proud. That type of pressure is what drives me. It drives me toward my purpose if that makes sense.”

Whatever LeBron James manages to accomplish with the Los Angeles Lakers under his new four-year deal and perhaps beyond it shouldn’t diminish anything Kobe Bryant did for the organization during his legendary 20-year run.

Lakers controlling owner and president Jeanie Buss thinks The Black Mamba’s resume donning purple and gold will forever be unrivaled, even by a once-in-a-lifetime generational talent like James.

“You talked about Kobe’s legacy; no one will ever touch Kobe’s legacy for what he did with the Lakers,” said Buss during an appearance on Fox Sports Radio, according to Silver Screen and Roll’s Anthony Irwin.

“The fact that he stayed with the team for 20 years and won us five championships. To even question Kobe’s legacy or what he means to Lakers fans; it’s ridiculous.”

Bryant is one of just two players in league history, along with Dirk Nowitzki, to spend 20 or more years with the same franchise. He’s the Lakers’ all-time leader in games played, minutes played, points, field goals, free throws, 3-pointers, steals, and win shares, and currently ranks third on the NBA’s all-time scoring list.

Natalya spoke with The Sun about her Father (Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart) not wanting her in wrestling, training at the Hart Dungeon, and how he family has influenced her wrestling career. Here are some of the highlights:

Training in the Hart Dungeon:

“There was only one other girl in there with me and about 25 different guys coming in and out over the years. So for the most part there were only men to train with. We got treated all the same. I’m grateful for those days because nothing was handed to me – it made me stronger. Training with men made me tougher. I had to learn to stand on my own two feet. When I look back, it’s helped me so much. There’s nothing I can’t get through in WWE.”

Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart not initially being thrilled with her getting into wrestling:

“He was very protective. I have two sisters and he didn’t want us in the ring. When he was competing, there wasn’t a prominent women’s division. He came from a different era and he didn’t want us to get hurt. Females become more dominant in WWE with Trish Stratus and Lita, but it wasn’t until he saw me have my first match … he’s been my biggest fan ever since.”

How family has influenced her wrestling career:

“My family have influenced me heavily. I loved Owen’s style – I’m not a high flyer but I love looking back at his matches for his personality.Bret was always great at selling and he’d always make you believe. Bret was also compatible with everyone he worked with. Whoever it was, they’d always say Bret was their favorite match – from Roddy Piper to Steve Austin. And British Bulldog was so agile for a guy his size. He could do just about anything. I’m a bigger girl – sturdy and I can do a lot of power moves, but I’m also agile on my feet.

“Every time I do the surfboard submission hold I think of British Bulldog – I pay homage to him. And the Sharpshooter is me paying homage to Bret and our family’s legacy. And my father was about power. Just the way he moved around in the ring… we have a lot of the same mannerisms. I look back at old matches and think we’re so much alike. When I first started I didn’t want to do the things they did or wear the same colors because I didn’t want people to think I was riding off my family’s coattails. Now I see it differently – I’m proud of them.”

Natalya also discussed more about her family. You can check out the full interview by clicking here.

Tessa Blanchard spoke with Impact Wrestling on coming to the Knockouts division, wanting a title shot, and being a third generation wrestler. Here are some of the highlights:

Coming to the Knockouts division:

“I came to the Knockouts Division because it’s no secret that the past six months or so IMPACT’s been making strides. The hottest free agents out there – Pentagon, Fenix, Brian Cage – IMPACT has locked them down. When it comes to the Knockouts Division, I’m the hottest free agent out there right now!”

Wanting a title shot sooner than later:

“I’m not looking to work my way up. I feel like I deserve a shot at the Knockouts Championship. On the independent circuit I’ve traveled the world, I’ve won championships, I’ve won tournaments – I’ve defeated some of the best out there so I feel like I am one of the best.”

Being a third generation wrestler:

“Carrying on the Blanchard name is a huge honor for me because my grandfather, my father and my step-father – they’ve all put a lot into their legacy and for me to carry that on, it’s a lot of weight on my shoulders. I put pressure on myself to be the best and to carry on the Blanchard name with dignity and with pride.”

Blanchard talked more about wanting a title shot. You can check out the full interview by clicking here.

manuisthinking_0

Manu Ginobili has been a cornerstone of the San Antonio Spurs organization since 2002, yet when his career inevitably comes to an end, the now 40-year-old guard won’t allow himself to dwell on the legacy he’s left behind.

“I’ve been asked about my legacy and I really don’t care much about the legacy,” Ginobili said during a recent appearance on SiriusXM NBA Radio, according to Spurs Zone’s Jeff Garcia.

“Earlier or later I want to be remembered as a good person, a good dude, that I was here around in town, and fun to watch, and good to hang out with but after a few years it’s going to be forgotten. The legacy thing is very overrated.”

Entering his 16th season with the Spurs, Ginobili – who re-signed on a two-year, $5-million contract back in August – has pretty much accomplished everything he set out to do. He has four championships on his resume, has made two All-Star teams, was an All-NBA Third Team member twice, and former Sixth Man of the Year.

His mindset is that the Spurs will carry on without him, and that no matter how great he is or was, someone will eventually step up in his place, and he’ll simply be an afterthought. Because of that, Ginobili chooses to look forward and avoid fretting about how people will look back on his playing days.

“We’re going to be gone soon and somebody better is going to come up, always! There’s always somebody better than you. If you live your life thinking about your legacy or what you’re going to leave, you don’t worry than you add another concern,” he added. “Just live your life every single day, do the best you can and that’s more of my motto than leaving a legacy.”

Ginobili played 69 games last season for San Antonio, averaging career lows in minutes (18.7), points (7.5), and field-goal percentage (39 percent).

dolzqeuyehnhk7s1kbix

Randy Moss believes he’ll go down as one of the all-time great players in football history, regardless of how long it takes him to obtain a Hall of Fame jacket.

“First ballot or not, I understand what it is, man,” Moss said Thursday, according to Mark Craig of the Minneapolis Star Tribune. “It’s a political war, and I was one of those guys who didn’t play (politics), nor do I intend to play into politics. So I know what I stood for. I know what the game is. I gave my all to the game, 14 years through the ups and downs, I still gave my commitment to the National Football League. Like it or not.”

The former wide receiver will be eligible for induction into the Hall of Fame for the first time in 2018. He boasts some of the greatest numbers ever amassed by a wideout, yet the same could be said for Terrell Owens, who was kept out by voters in his first round of eligibility this year.

Moss, like Owens, picked up a reputation early in his career as a poor locker-room presence, and wasn’t always on the greatest of terms with the media. Though, he seemed to turn around his image toward the end of his career.

“All I know is I just played the game to the best of my ability,” Moss said. “I put my mark, I put my stamp, I put my family’s name on football, the National Football League. You can’t get any higher.”

Moss finished his 14-year career ranked second on the NFL’s all-time list in receiving touchdowns and third in receiving yards.

Jerry Rice, Steve Largent, Paul Warfield, and Raymond Berry are the only wide receivers who’ve been elected to the Hall on the first ballot.