Posts Tagged ‘Stone Cold Steve Austin’

Jake Roberts spoke with the Milwaukee Record on working with “Stone Cold” Steve Austin and if having his cobra bite a wrestler would work in today’s pro wrestling. Here are some of the highlights:

Working with “Stone Cold” Steve Austin and his famous “Austin 3:16” promo at King of the Ring in 1996:

“It was important for me because Steve had came to the WWF and, you know, he was kind of treated poorly a couple of other places and not been given the shot. You know, to make himself known, really. You know, he was Stunning Steve for awhile and he was with DiBiase as the Ringmaster. And I was writing television at the time for Vince [McMahon] and I told Vince, ‘That’s your guy right there’ and he’s like ‘Are you kidding? No way, Jake. That guy is middle of the card.’ And I’m like, ‘Really?’

“From that point on, I started getting with Steve every night. If I wasn’t in the same town with him, he would call me. I’d go over his match. I’d go over and talk to him about doing different things, and saying different things, and creating, and we put it together. He just had to be himself, basically. That was the problem. They let him be himself and he became Steve Austin. The Austin 3:16 thing, everyone was like, ‘Oh, that must have really upset you.’ Are you kidding me? You know how many people opened the Bible just to check that out who had never even opened a bible before, you know? Yeah, I’ve got my relationship with God. He knows where I’m going, I don’t, but he does. So that didn’t offend me at all.

“The only thing that kind of upset me is they didn’t put the money maker out there which would’ve been Austin’s 10 commandments. You know: Thou shall not kill unless thou are pissed. Thou shall not covet thy neighbor’s wife unless she’s really hot. Thou shall honor thy mother and father unless they’re jerks. You know, right on down the line. You could’ve had a lot of fun with that. That would’ve been a great seller, no doubt. Steve Austin, that was a— you know, a lot of guys can help themselves in this business. But to me, the people that mean the most are guys that can help everybody, and that’s what I prided myself on. And that was my job in the WWF.”

Talking about his cobra biting “Macho Man” Randy Savage and if that would work in today’s wrestling:

“I could still do it. Yeah, I could still do it. That’s the problem today. Nobody can do much of anything because guys aren’t allowed to be their own characters. You know, when you have people writing television that also write the interviews, it doesn’t work because that person cannot put out there what this guy would say. They don’t know him from inside and out.

“That’s one thing that we had with this group here is that we did our own interviews, man, and we were able to get our characters out there. You can’t get a character out if you’re having five or six different people write interviews for you. It just doesn’t work. They should see that and move on, but they can’t take the time to teach all these guys how to do interviews. You know, or write interviews. I never wrote an interview in my life, but when that camera came on, I was able to do one.”

Roberts also discussed his live show and his The Resurrection of Jake the Snakedocumentary. You can check out the full interview by clicking here.

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WWE Hall Of Famer Steve Austin recently participated in a fan Q&A session on The Steve Austin Show. During the podcast, Austin discussed his relationship with fellow WWE Hall Of Famer Jim Ross and the tremendous impact that Ross has had on Austin’s legendary professional wrestling career.

On the subject of Ross, Austin said he grew up a fan of ‘Good Ol’ JR’ from watching Mid-South Wrestling and NWA. Interestingly, Austin shared that Ross helped the former ‘Stunning’ Steve get signed to WCW and that the pair always got along famously.

“Now, as I am trying to recall the first time I met Jim Ross, I almost can’t remember, but you have to understand I was a huge Bill Watts Mid-South Wrestling fan, so, man, I grew up with JR.” Austin remembered, “and he’s not very much older than me, but JR was the man. And then, when he went to NWA, that’s when I was watching Jim Ross. He was the man. And all-of-a-sudden, I get a chance to be called up to WCW. He’s one of the guys that lobbied for me and we hit it off. Jim loves football. He knew that I played college football. I wasn’t at Ron Simmons’ level. I wasn’t major college good. I was just good enough to get a scholarship and be on the team. That’s as good as I was. But Jim being in Oklahoma and that Texas/Oklahoma kind of bond, relationship, rivalry, whatever it is, Jim respected and liked football players. He liked guys that were athletic, salty, easy to work with, not people that are toxic or that are trainwrecks, or divas, or hard to work with. So, man, me and Jim always hit it off and we became the best of friends.”

Austin divulged that he and Ross would travel together, drinking wine and fantasy booking the territory.

“Me and Jim would ride down the road and we’d have a bottle of wine.” Austin recalled, “I don’t know how we started drinking wine. I used to drink wine like a son of a b—h way back in the day, but we’d drink a bottle of red wine between the towns. It’s only about 120 miles. We’d book the territory, tell stories… If I ever went to a football game I would go stay with him and Jan when she was still with us. And Jim’s out doing his own thing now, but, man, nothing but respect for him.”

According to Austin, Ross is the best commentator of all time and the two are still close today. Moreover, Austin suggested that JR was important to the success of the ‘Stone Cold’ character.

“Jim Ross, to me, with his range, with his storytelling… he paid his dues. I mean, he learned from the ground up. And his inflection and his ability to watch a match, tell a story, get the talent over with the credibility that he had, he was the shining diamond on top of everyone, so always a good experience with Jim. We continue, to this day, to be the best of friends. We don’t talk as much as we used to because we’re going and blowing in different directions. But he was a key, key part of my entire [pro] wrestling career like so many people were, but as far as the recruitment to WCW, the recruitment to WWF [as WWE was known] at the time, so there’s a lot of history there.

“Again, if ‘Stone Cold’ would’ve took off like it did and Jim Ross had not been on commentary, I do believe I still would have been successful; however, I think I had the success that I did because of the work that we put into it. This is on the [WWE] end, my end, the synergy, the chemistry, the writing, Vince [McMahon] was a huge part of it, especially when we were going up against each other, but without Jim Ross calling that with the emotion and just yelling, that passion driven style that he had, I don’t think it would have been the same. He was the voice of that ‘Attitude Era’.” Austin added, “I can’t imagine my career because it is so far removed now, but I cannot imagine my career without the iconic voice of the one and only Jim Ross.”

In recent weeks, the feud between SmackDown Live women’s champion Becky Lynch and Charlotte Flair has been given the top billing on Tuesday nights. Flair was recently a guest on Chasing Glory with Lilian Garcia and discussed the rivalry.

Arguably the best feud the SmackDown Live women’s division has ever seen, Flair and Lynch have captivated the WWE Universe ever since Lynch turned on her best friend at SummerSlam. Flair said it’s been a while since she has been involved in a significant rivalry and she is enjoying every bit of it.

“Anytime you can find yourself in a meaningful storyline you run with it. It’s the first time in a while for me that—I have been in so many great storylines but I think the fans are really sinking their teeth in this one and see how far you can take it,” Flair said. “It is exciting; it feels fresh and new. Even though Becky Lynch and I have had the opportunity to wrestle each other, this time the dynamic is different, which makes it even more exciting.”

With Lynch as the heel for the first time in her career on the main roster, this iteration of the feud is different from previous ones. Lynch and Flair are real-life best friends, so Flair believes their familiarity with one another has only helped their on-screen storyline.

“Becky Lynch and I came up through NXT together, so in terms of how we view how things should be in the ring and psychology and I know what she does well and she knows what I do well because we have talked about it in the car so no, I think it makes for a better overall presentation,” Flair said.

Despite playing the babyface, Flair has consistently been booed by audiences throughout this feud. It’s less about a dislike for her, and more about a devotion to cheering for Lynch. Flair said she doesn’t mind the negative reaction because it is better than no reaction at all.

“Honestly, if I wasn’t getting a reaction then there would be a problem,” she said. “Whether I am getting cheered or booed you are here to make the audience react and that is how I look at it. I don’t look at it as a negative. I look at it as the fans are invested in the story.”

Flair was also asked about her feud being compared to the rivalry between The Rock and “Stone Cold” Steve Austin. She humbly accepted the compliment, but noted the comparisons are a result of the chemistry she shares with Lynch.

“One, it is flattering to be, I guess. People talk about this being one of the greatest feuds of all time. That is very flattering but I don’t know, I mean, I guess, yeah. I don’t want to sit here and say that I don’t see myself as The Rock, but I don’t see myself as Steve Austin,” she said. “I do think that the fan reaction that we are getting maybe that is why people are saying that because of these two dominant stars are going at it and the chemistry, and the attitude and the presence is why they are saying that.”

Becky Lynch is regarded as one of the best female wrestlers in the WWE because she’s not only a great in-ring performer, but also her character connects with the WWE Universe. Lynch recently spoke to Wrestling Compadres about some of her inspirations.

Lynch has been a beloved babyface among fans going all the way back to her time in NXT. Lynch said the most difficult thing about being a wrestler for her was the athletic aspect, but she always believed she had strong character work because of how much time she put in to perfecting her craft. Lynch said a huge influence on her was the legendary Dusty Rhodes, who helped her become more confident in herself.

“Dusty Rhodes was a really important part of building up my confidence because even though I felt physically that I had never been an athlete–that is something that I have kind of learned, the athletic part was really hard for me,” Lynch said. “But the talking ability and the ability of being a character was something that I had studied and that was something that I was constantly working at when I was outside of the pro wrestling world. Without his support I don’t know that I would be here today.”

Lynch said she also drew inspiration from the old “My Sacrifice” videos that the WWE produced starring “Stone Cold” Steve Austin. She said those videos were very important to her not giving up even when times were hard on her.

“Even when it was really tough and i would cry most days, most days I would cry, but it never felt like it was the wrong thing. It was like, this is really hard, and this is the hard that they talk about. Remember those WWE-produced videos of ‘My Sacrifice’ by Creed where ‘Stone Cold’ Steve Austin would talk about all those sacrifices that he had gone through he wouldn’t give them up for anything because they made him what they were today,” Lynch said. “Those videos were so motivational and inspirational and I would always go back to those videos and say that this is ‘My Sacrifice’ moment where I was poor, cars kept breaking down on me, my teeth needed root canals, and this was when I was in NXT, which is a long story, but one thing kept happening after another and I was broke and I wasn’t good in the ring and I wasn’t able to find a character, but then you keep pushing through and eventually you get there.”

Becky Lynch spoke with the Las Cruces Sun News about Jim Ross’ comparison to “Stone Cold” Steve Austin, if she’s a heel now, and WWE Evolution. Here are some of the highlights:

Her feud with Charlotte and if she’s a heel now:

“Whatever I am doing right now, I am loving it. Whatever this is, I love it. Just in general, people around the world … you try and be the nice person, always. Everybody. And I think this is so relatable. For the most part, people are generally good and want to do the right thing. And sometimes, it just backfires on you. My dad used to always tell me no good deed goes unpunished. And I think that’s what you’re seeing with Becky right now, that she’s always done the right thing and it hasn’t gotten her where she wants it.

“And now she’s had enough and she’s saying ‘I don’t care who’s in my way.’ I left home at 16, traveled the world and slept on people’s couches. I came with a goal and I haven’t gotten that because I have been too focused on doing the right thing always when other people aren’t. That’s what we’re seeing and she’s had enough … she’s not letting them be an obstacle anymore.”

Jim Ross comparing Becky Lynch to “Stone Cold” Steve Austin:

“That means the world. You can’t get a better comparison than being compared to ‘Stone Cold’ Steve Austin. He’s one of the greatest. He’s so smart in how he did things, his reactions and how we would sell things. Just his charisma and how we would talk. It was impossible to not want to cheer that guy because he was doing what we all wanted to do. None of us want to take crap from anybody and I think that’s the same thing Becky Lynch is doing right now too. That’s the highest honor you could possibly be given.”

WWE Evolution:

“As soon as it was announced, I said I am going to walk in there as a champion, I am going to the main event show and I am going to walk out as champion. The goal is to be the main event of Evolution, have everybody talk about it and have it be the best pay-per-view of all time, and of course, the best main event of all time because Becky Lynch is going to be in it and she’s going to bringing a whole of straight fire.”

Lynch also discussed working her way towards WWE. You can check out the full interview by clicking here.

One of the most memorable moments of the Attitude Era was “Stone Cold” Steve Austin getting hit by a car. On Something To Wrestle with Bruce Prichard, the former WWEproducer discussed whether or not the plan was always for Rikishi to be revealed as the driver who ran down Austin.

Austin was hit by a car at the 1999 Survivor Series as a way to give him time off because of his impending surgery. Nearly a year later, Rikishi admitted to being the driver, turning heel in the process. It was later revealed that then-WWE Champion Triple H orchestrated the entire thing and hired Rikishi. Prichard explained that there originally wasn’t a plan for who the driver was because backstage officials, including WWE Chairman Vince McMahon, didn’t see the significance in revealing who ran down Austin. They were just focused on getting Austin off TV so he can recover from his injuries.

“There was no original plan. There was no plan. It was, we will do this and then they came back to, well, who drove the car, and let’s make that a storyline. The idea was to pull Steve Austin off of television because of his surgery. When it came time to figure out who drove the car, McMahon was asking why it mattered who drove the car? Well, somebody hit him with the car. How can you try and get away from that? It wasn’t thought of prior to,” Prichard said. “There were a lot of assumptions on whether or not Steve was coming back, so it was left open as far as who it was going to be and what they were going to do. There wasn’t a whole plan on who it was going to be and what we were going to do. When we came down to it was like, now what?”

Prichard also discussed Barry Windham’s run as The Widowmaker. When he returned to the WWE in 1989, Windham assumed the new character and whent undefeated for four months. The character was short-lived, as Windham ended up leaving the company again. Prichard said the character was his idea and he thought Windham’s run ended prematurely, but there was nothing he could do because Windham desired to leave the WWE.

“I think that The Widowmaker would have worked huge. It was my idea and I loved it. I loved it. The Widowmaker was the ‘baddest bull,’ the one bull that couldn’t be ridden. I thought the name was cool,” Prichard said. “When Barry came in, and once again, I think travel and everything that came along with it that didn’t fit his lifestyle and he did not want to be there. Vince McMahon liked Barry a lot. He said to Windham that if he didn’t want to be here that he was going to let him go. At that time Barry chose to go.”

Recently on The Steve Austin Show, WWE Hall Of Famer Steve Austin shared his thoughts on WWE’s Women’s Division, talking about WWE SmackDown Live’s Becky Lynch and her recent heel turn. Also, Austin weighed in on the potential WrestleMania main event match between current RAW and SmackDown Women’s Champions Ronda Rousey and Charlotte Flair.

According to Austin, Lynch does not need to be a heel or a babyface. Moreover, ‘The Toughest S.O.B.’ suggested that WWE should follow the lead of the WWE Universe and present ‘The Lass Kicker’ how the wrestleverse wants.

“I loved [Ric] Flair as a heel. He’s the greatest [pro] wrestler of all time, but his heel work was outstanding. His baby work, eh, he’s still Ric Flair, but I like Ric Flair as a heel.” Austin continued, “Charlotte I like as a heel. Becky I like either way. But, man, when she knocked the hell out of Charlotte, that crowd came unglued when they turned her heel, but it was the biggest babyface reaction of the night. People came unglued, so where does she go?

“I just think let her be whatever the people want her to be. To me, for her, she doesn’t need to be a heel or a baby – she just needs to be Becky Lynch. And this is truly one of those cases where they say, Roman Reigns, no matter how the people want to take him, they can take him as a heel or baby, but he’s just going to be Roman. To me, I just think let’s take that out of the equation. Whatever they’re going to do with him, they’re going to do, with him beating Brock [Lesnar], but Becky ought to just be Becky because there’s money in Becky being Becky. Let the people decide. As long as she’s being true to herself, she’s going to fly as high and as far as they want her to.”

With respect to a possible WrestleMania main event between Rousey and Flair, Austin seemed to be in favor of such an epic encounter; however, the six-time WWE Champion would prefer a heel versus babyface match between the two as opposed to a babyface versus babyface match.

“For me, Charlotte is a defined heel. We know she’s a heel. We’re pushing her as a heel. We’re booking her as a heel. Yeah, to me, she has a defined role. She’s totally confident in either one, but I think she’s more comfortable as a heel. And that’s not from me talking to her. That’s from me guessing that she’s more comfortable as a heel, but she’s going to do whatever they ask of her.” Austin said, “boy, that has the potential to be a hell of a main event, but then you’ve got two babies. Would you go two babies or would you make sure Charlotte’s a heel because Ronda needs to be the baby?”