Posts Tagged ‘Mark Cuban’

A former Dallas Mavericks senior account executive watched pornography on his office computer while sometimes showing co-workers images of topless, naked, or lingerie-clad women on his phone, seven current and former Mavs employees told The Dallas Morning News’ Brandon George and Eddie Sefko.

The employees, who requested anonymity, said Chris Hyde’s behavior continued for six years after owner Mark Cuban warned him to stop viewing pornography on his work computer or he’d be fired. His colleagues say Hyde didn’t stop, and five of the ex-employees said they never formally complained to human resources because they thought the actions were common knowledge and accepted by superiors.

Hyde, who was fired in 2014, dropped a used condom onto the office floor in 2011, according to colleagues – who gave Hyde the nickname “Pants DJ” because they sometimes saw him rubbing himself below the waist while seated at his desk. Two sources said Cuban was informed about the condom incident.

The latest news comes as the Mavericks continue an internal investigation headed by new CEO Cynthia Marshall into reports of a workplace culture rife with sexual harassment and outright assault. Former team CEO Terdema Ussery was named repeatedly in a February Sports Illustrated report as an aggressor, while the Mavs fired former writer Earl Sneed shortly after details of domestic violence incidents in his past surfaced (including another Mavs employee’s 2014 report to the team that he’d assaulted her).

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Mark Cuban is denying any wrongdoing after a report published details of a woman coming forward to police in 2011 stating the Dallas Mavericks owner sexually assaulted her in Portland, Ore.

“It didn’t happen,” wrote Cuban in an email to the Associated Press.

Willamette Week’s Nigel Jaquiss obtained a police report via a public records request from May 2011 of a woman contacting the Portland Police Bureau to speak out against Cuban. She says Cuban – who admitted to consuming alcohol that night – put his hand down the back of her jeans and penetrated her vagina with his finger as they were posing for a photo together at an Old Town nightclub.

The woman waited more than a week to come forward, later telling a detective she didn’t want to be labeled as “that girl” in a sex scandal with Cuban.

No charges were laid against Cuban, as the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office determined there was insufficient evidence.

“Because all leads have been exhausted and there remains a lack of physical or circumstantial evidence, I recommend the case be suspended,” wrote Senior Deputy District Attorney Don Rees on July 27, 2011.

Cuban’s attorney, Stephen Houze, also released a statement: “This incident never happened and her accusations are false.”

The woman was recently contacted by Willamette Week. She says she’s moved on from the incident and is “a happy person” with “a wonderful life,” but still stands by her account from seven years ago.

Mark Cuban says he messed up.

The Dallas Mavericks owner took sole responsibility for retaining former Mavs.com writer Earl K. Sneed after two separate domestic violence incidents, adding that he wasn’t aware of the “gruesome details.”

“I want to be clear, I’m not putting the blame on anybody else,” Cuban told ESPN’s Tim MacMahon on Wednesday. “It came down to my final decision that I made.”

In the first incident, Sneed got into an altercation with his then-girlfriend that left her with a fractured wrist and bruises on her body. He was arrested two months later at the Mavericks’ office, and pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges of family violence assault in June 2012. Sneed paid a $750 fine and completed both community service and an anger management program, which resulted in the charges being dismissed.

Cuban allowed the writer to return to the Mavericks after some counseling. Looking back, the billionaire businessman said he regrets not following up with police for more details.

“So we got it mostly from Earl’s perspective, and because we didn’t dig in with the details – and obviously it was a horrible mistake in hindsight – we kind of, I don’t want to say took his word for it, but we didn’t see all the gruesome details until just recently,” Cuban said. “I didn’t read the police report on that until just (Tuesday), and that was a huge mistake obviously.”

Sneed was involved in another domestic dispute in 2014, that time with a co-worker whom he was living with and dating, and rendered her face swollen. The woman informed her supervisor as well as HR director Buddy Pittman of the incident, but Cuban let Sneed keep his job.

The team owner indicated his rationale was wanting to control Sneed’s problem through counseling rather than setting him loose to find another job and continue to act violently toward women.

“I made the decision that we would make him go to domestic abuse counseling as a requirement to continued employment, that he was not allowed to be alone without a chaperone in the presence of any other women in the organization or any other women in a business setting at all, and he was not allowed to date anybody (who works for the Mavericks),” Cuban said.

Cuban added that he’d handle the situation differently if he had the chance. He expressed the most regret about not realizing the message his decision sent to the rest of his employees and the toxic environment it ultimately enabled.

It wasn’t until Tuesday when Sports Illustrated published findings from an investigation into the Mavericks’ misogynistic and predatory culture that Cuban ostensibly fired Sneed and Pittman.

Nerlens Noel hasn’t appeared in a game for the Dallas Mavericks since Nov. 22. He’s not listed on the team’s injury report, and all scratches have been DNP-CDs. The reason, sources told NBC 5 Dallas’ Newy Scruggs, is that the Mavs don’t view the big man as a hard worker.

Noel has been in an odd position with Dallas since being dealt from the 76ers at last season’s trade deadline. As the summer market for restricted free agents dried up, he signed his qualifying offer for $4.1 million with the Mavericks. But what appeared to be a golden opportunity to showcase his talents ahead of unrestricted free agency next summer is quickly disappearing.

Head coach Rick Carlisle said last month Noel had to earn his minutes, something he clearly has yet to do. In the time he has seen the floor, the defensive specialist is averaging career lows in rebounds and blocks.

“Nerlens decided to bet on himself,” Mavs owner Mark Cuban said in September, “and now we’re in a position where, if everybody comes out ahead this coming season, he’ll get paid, we’ll be happy, and we’ll go on with life.”

At this rate, however, nothing appears to be helping his cause.

On Saturday, Noel appeared in the media room at the American Airlines Center to grab a hot dog at halftime of the Mavs’ win over the Clippers. “I needed some energy for the second half,” he said, according to SB Nation’s Tim Cato, though he never played a minute.

Carlisle laughed it off, telling reporters: “I hear the hot dogs are pretty good.”

Draymond Green still isn’t apologizing, nor is he backing down on his stance.

The Golden State Warriors forward said last month people should stop referring to a team’s proprietor as an “owner” because being “owned by someone just sets a bad precedent to start.”

Dallas Mavericks majority owner Mark Cuban disagreed with Green, saying team owners own equity, not people, and demanded an apology from the reigning Defensive Player of the Year to the NBA.

When he was initially asked about it, Green declined. But on Thursday, he said he understands how equity works and that he wouldn’t expect the businessman to understand where he’s coming from.

“Mark Cuban will never know or understand how it feels for me, a young black African-American, to turn on the TV and see what happened in Charlottesville. He’ll never have that feeling,” he said Thursday at Harvard University.

“So, when I say, ‘Hey maybe we shouldn’t use that word,’ to be honest, I really don’t expect him to understand where I’m coming from because he’ll never feel what I feel when I turn on the TV and see however many people are taken down by the KKK or whatever group it was. He’ll never know that feeling that I have about that.

“And you can try to understand it, and he will still never understand it to the degree that I do. … It’s not to take a shot at the owners of these entities; it’s more so trying to help spark change to help others that may be similar to me, because he may feel the same way that I feel because I’m African-American.”

Green concluded that Cuban is wrong for calling his opinion wrong.

“You can’t say I’m dead wrong because you really don’t know how it feels to turn on that TV and see a young black man shot by a police officer and he was unarmed,” he said.

“You will never get that feeling, so it’s hard to say I’m wrong.”

Few people love a debate more than Mark Cuban, and the Dallas Mavericks owner took issue with recent comments Draymond Green made regarding how the term “owner” is used.

In the wake of Houston Texans owner Bob McNair referring to NFL players as “inmates,” Green took to Instagram to compare the business magnate to disgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. Green also inferred that labeling a team’s proprietor an “owner” is insulting to players.

“For starters, let’s stop using the word owner and maybe use the word chairman,” Green wrote. “To be owned by someone just sets a bad precedent to start. It sets the wrong tone. It gives one the wrong mindset.”

Cuban isn’t buying that, pointing out the nomenclature doesn’t refer to the ownership of people.

“For (Green) to try to turn it into something it’s not, is wrong,” Cuban told ESPN’s Tim MacMahon. “He owes the NBA an apology.”

He added: “We own equity, we don’t own people. And there’s a big difference … people who bust their ass and work hard and get a little bit lucky have enough money to buy enough shares of stock to buy a company.”

Cuban then proceeded to take a Big Ten-related shot at the Golden State Warriors forward (the Mavs owner is a Hoosier, Green a Spartan).

“Draymond can trash-talk on the court, but when he comes into our world, it doesn’t fly,” the tech billionaire said. “I guess it’s because he went to Michigan State and didn’t take any business classes, but you own equity. When you own a team, you own equity, shares of stock. That’s called ownership. Tell him if he wants to take classes at Indiana‘s business school, I’ll even pay for his classes and we’ll help him learn that stuff.”

NBA: Phoenix Suns at Dallas Mavericks

Colin Kaepernick may possibly be out of a job as a result of his on-field political protests, but at least one owner believes things would be different if he played another sport.

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban thinks the free-agent quarterback’s protest of “The Star-Spangled Banner” would’ve been embraced if he played in the NBA, saying that many basketball players have been supported by the league when voicing their political views.

“I don’t know what his status is in the NFL, but I’m glad the NBA doesn’t have a politician litmus test for our players,” Cuban told Rick Maese of The Washington Post. “I’d like to think we encourage our players to exercise their constitutional rights.”

A number of NBA teams staged their own protests during last year’s preseason, linking arms with one another in solidarity during the American national anthem.

“The NBA is such a global game,” Cuban wrote in an email, as quoted by Maese. “I think our players exposure to different political systems among their teammates may help them appreciate our country even more and encourage their participation.”

While NBA commissioner Adam Silver has often been supportive when his players take public stands on social issues, he said prior to last year’s regular season that standing for the national anthem was “the appropriate thing to do.”