Posts Tagged ‘Los Angeles’

WrestleMania Premiere Party A Celebration Of Miami Art And Fashion

WWE Hall Of Famer and Houston native Booker T is hosting a special live version of his “Heated Conversations” podcast later this month as part of a benefit for those affected by Hurricane Harvey.

Taking place Sept. 24 in Los Angeles, the benefit will feature appearances by WWE Superstars, raffles, and wrestling memorabilia to be auctioned off, including autographed items from Kurt Angle and Samoa Joe.

Booker T, who’s real name is Robert Booker Tio Huffman, announced in December that he plans to run for mayor of Houston in 2019.

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mark-davis

The turf war between the Chargers and Rams – as the franchises compete for the fans of Los Angeles – may be a battle for second place, at least according to Oakland Raiders owner Mark Davis.

As the Raiders faced the Rams last weekend, Davis was asked about the two new L.A. clubs’ fight to be the most popular football team in town, but said local fans have instead chosen a third option on the ballot.

“You know, it’s kind of funny,” Davis told Vincent Bonsignore of Los Angeles Daily News. “They’re talking about the fight for Los Angeles. And Raiders fans have been telling me we already won that fight, And that the Rams and Chargers are fighting for the No. 2 and 3 spots …

“I think we already won the battle.”

The Raiders resided in Los Angeles from 1982-94 and left a lasting impression on the area. Davis said that while “Raider Nation” exists all over the world, the fans in Southern California have always been very supportive and that the club wants to keep a strong relationship with the community.

“A good portion (of the Raiders’ fans) have come from Los Angeles and Southern California,” Davis added. “Without stepping on any toes, we’re going to market ourselves in Los Angeles area. And San Diego. We’re reaching out to Raider Nation in Southern California. It’s strong there.”

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According to the NFL, it’s much cheaper to move to Las Vegas than to Los Angeles.

The Rams and Chargers, who will both be playing in L.A., will pay $645 million between December 2019 and December 2028, while the Raiders will pay $378 million over 10 years to relocate to Las Vegas, sources told ESPN’s Darren Rovell.

The 29 NFL teams who are not or have not relocated to Los Angeles or Las Vegas are taking home a hefty profit from those who are.

Each team will receive a sum of $55.2 million over an 11-year period stemming from the relocation fees paid by the Rams, Chargers, and Raiders.

The Green Bay Packers released their projected net sum from the relocation fees as $27.1 million, accounting for present value of money over time and taxes, at a recent shareholders meeting.

NFL Meetings Press Conference Pete Carroll

Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll may work in the Pacific Northwest, but he has some experience guiding a football team in California.

The former USC football coach watched as a second NFL team moved to Los Angeles on Thursday and he has reservations about the idea of there being more competition in the second-largest media market in the country.

“I think it’s hard having one, so it’s going to be harder having two,” Carroll said of the now-Los Angeles Chargers and Los Angeles Rams, according to Bob Condotta of the Seattle Times.

“It’ll be interesting. It’s going to be fascinating to see what happens and I think it’s an extraordinary challenge for the people of the area to figure out their allegiance and what they’re doing,” he continued. “There will be a strong pull, I’m sure, from the southern part down by San Diego and all through that. It will be fascinating to see what happens. It’s an enormous experiment.”

Forgive Carroll for using the term “experiment,” but the Rams and Chargers have left town before, as did the Raiders who currently reside in Oakland.

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Philip Rivers has spent his entire 13-year career with the same franchise. Now that franchise is moving to a new city and the veteran quarterback doesn’t quite know how to handle it.

“I’m a little bit numb about it all. It hasn’t really settled in,” Rivers told KLSD-AM in San Diego on Friday, according to NFL.com’s Kevin Patra.

The Chargers announced Thursday that they will be leaving San Diego after 55 years and moving down the road to Los Angeles. Rivers wants to be excited at the new opportunities a relocation brings, but is having a a hard time letting go of the city he called home for over a decade.

“I want it to be clear that my love for San Diego, the time here, the memories we had, the games, the practices, everything about it is special and awesome,” said Rivers. “But at the same time, I hope people understand this, I have to get excited, fired up about going up to a new area and representing our team and organization and going and trying to win as many games as we can win. And be the same guy that I’ve always been.”

While Rivers isn’t interested in changing his personality for fans, he’s concerned that his legacy as one of San Diego’s favorite athletes will be tarnished if he shows enthusiasm over a move that’s upset many supporters.

“I’m kind of in the middle of that of leaving behind something that you love, you’re thankful for,” said the Chargers’ all-time passing leader. “And you want to make sure everybody knows that. And then at the same time I don’t want people here to go, ‘Godly, he sure seems so fired up to go up there.’ I’m just fired up all the time, whatever the task is. That’s just the only way I know.

“I hope as the dust settles a little bit, I know there are a lot of emotions right now, that people could understand that. I hope that when the dust does settle that the people that have been fans here for a long time can still watch a game on Sunday and go, ‘Hey, that’s our quarterback.’ You want them to still feel that because you always do. It’s like your hometown.”

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The Los Angeles Chargers, it is.

Effectively squashing all rumors of an eventual name change, the Chargers organization told Sam Farmer of The Los Angeles Times on Thursday that they have no plans to rebrand as part of the now-confirmed move to Los Angeles.

There was some brief traction to talk of an overhaul in the fallout of the team’s official announcement, and such a strategy could have acted as a means for the club to completely start over in the nation’s second-largest market.

But the Chargers have had the same name since their AFL inception back in 1960, and it’s not as if the organization is completely devoid of ties to the Los Angeles area.

Prior to setting up shop in San Diego, of course, the Chargers played the 1960 season in Los Angeles. Owner Dean Spanos pointed out as part of Thursday’s announcement that there are still fans in the area to this day.

Whether the Chargers make a change to their current look remains to be seen. A logo released Thursday appeared to indicate that such a redesign was already in the works, but reports have since said that that it was merely a marketing image that won’t appear on the team’s helmets or uniforms.

NFL Meetings Los Angeles Football

For the second time in as many years, the NFL will have a team relocating to Los Angeles.

The Chargers making the move official Thursday is an unfortunate result for the city of San Diego, and one that will earn ownership plenty of criticism for years to come.

In a statement released shortly after the team’s announcement, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell stressed that Dean Spanos and his family did everything they could to keep the Chargers in the place they’ve called home since 1961.

For more than a decade, the San Diego Chargers have worked diligently toward finding a local stadium solution, which all sides agreed was required. These efforts took on added intensity in the last two years. A year ago, NFL owners granted the Chargers an option to move to Los Angeles. Rather than immediately exercising that option, the team spent the past year continuing to work on finding a stadium solution in San Diego.

The Chargers worked tirelessly this past year with local officials and community leaders on a ballot initiative that fell short on election day. That work – and the years of effort that preceded it – reflects our strongly held belief we always should do everything we can to keep a franchise in its community. That’s why we have a deliberate and thoughtful process for making these decisions.

Relocation is painful for teams and communities. It is especially painful for fans, and the fans in San Diego have given the Chargers strong and loyal support for more than 50 years, which makes it even more disappointing that we could not solve the stadium issue. As difficult as the news is for Charger fans, I know Dean Spanos and his family did everything they could to try to find a viable solution in San Diego.

The Chargers, who unveiled a new logo Thursday, will play at StubHub Center for two seasons before joining the Rams when construction on a shared, $2.6-billion stadium in Inglewood is complete in 2019.