Posts Tagged ‘Dallas Mavericks’

Don Carter, who was instrumental in bringing the NBA to Dallas as a co-founding owner of the Mavericks, has died at age 84, the team confirmed.

Carter and co-owner Norm Sonju were awarded an NBA expansion franchise for Dallas in 1980. He said in 2005 that part of his decision to acquire a team was as a present to his wife, who had been a high school basketball player.

Carter sold his majority stake to Ross Perot Jr. in 1996, who in turn sold the team to Mark Cuban in 2000. Carter, however, remained a fixture at Mavericks games.

The Mavs will honor Carter with a moment of silence before their next home game on Feb. 26 against the Indiana Pacers.

Advertisements

Dirk Nowitzki is still chugging along at the ripe old age of 39.

The 7-foot German has started every game this season for the Dallas Mavericks, and while he can no longer jump or dive for loose balls, Nowitzki is putting up a respectable 11.1 points and 5.6 rebounds while making 41.6 percent of his threes.

Dallas appears destined for another trip to the lottery, but that doesn’t bother Nowitzki. So long as he feels healthy, he intends to play his 21st season for the Mavericks in 2018-19.

“I’m not going to say 100 percent I’ll be back – but it’s looking like it,” Nowitzki told Eddie Sefko of the Dallas Morning News. “I feel fine so far. I’ve played every game. I’d love to play all 82. That would be amazing at 39. We’ll see how the body feels. But so far, it’s been fine.”

Sticking around for a rebuilding effort doesn’t bother Nowitzki, who already did it all with the Mavericks including winning the franchise’s lone title in 2011. Nowitzki signed a two-year, $10-million contract this summer and he fully intends on honoring the entirety of that deal.

“We drafted an unbelievable prospect this summer (Dennis Smith Jr.) … I figured we’re going to be a team that’s rebuilding a little bit and trying to get better and trying to get back to winning ways.

“I signed up for, obviously, two years to help the franchise push through that and get better. I didn’t think we would be sitting here 10 (games) over .500. I mean, I wasn’t delusional. We felt like we might have a shot at sneaking into the playoffs. And we still do. We’ve played the toughest schedule in basketball to this point.

“As long as my body feels fine like it has so far, with no setbacks like last year when I missed two months, I’m looking forward to hopefully fulfilling my contract.”

Playing 21 seasons would make Nowitzki the longest-tenured player to suit up for only one franchise. He is currently tied with Kobe Bryant at 20.

Nerlens Noel hasn’t appeared in a game for the Dallas Mavericks since Nov. 22. He’s not listed on the team’s injury report, and all scratches have been DNP-CDs. The reason, sources told NBC 5 Dallas’ Newy Scruggs, is that the Mavs don’t view the big man as a hard worker.

Noel has been in an odd position with Dallas since being dealt from the 76ers at last season’s trade deadline. As the summer market for restricted free agents dried up, he signed his qualifying offer for $4.1 million with the Mavericks. But what appeared to be a golden opportunity to showcase his talents ahead of unrestricted free agency next summer is quickly disappearing.

Head coach Rick Carlisle said last month Noel had to earn his minutes, something he clearly has yet to do. In the time he has seen the floor, the defensive specialist is averaging career lows in rebounds and blocks.

“Nerlens decided to bet on himself,” Mavs owner Mark Cuban said in September, “and now we’re in a position where, if everybody comes out ahead this coming season, he’ll get paid, we’ll be happy, and we’ll go on with life.”

At this rate, however, nothing appears to be helping his cause.

On Saturday, Noel appeared in the media room at the American Airlines Center to grab a hot dog at halftime of the Mavs’ win over the Clippers. “I needed some energy for the second half,” he said, according to SB Nation’s Tim Cato, though he never played a minute.

Carlisle laughed it off, telling reporters: “I hear the hot dogs are pretty good.”

Draymond Green still isn’t apologizing, nor is he backing down on his stance.

The Golden State Warriors forward said last month people should stop referring to a team’s proprietor as an “owner” because being “owned by someone just sets a bad precedent to start.”

Dallas Mavericks majority owner Mark Cuban disagreed with Green, saying team owners own equity, not people, and demanded an apology from the reigning Defensive Player of the Year to the NBA.

When he was initially asked about it, Green declined. But on Thursday, he said he understands how equity works and that he wouldn’t expect the businessman to understand where he’s coming from.

“Mark Cuban will never know or understand how it feels for me, a young black African-American, to turn on the TV and see what happened in Charlottesville. He’ll never have that feeling,” he said Thursday at Harvard University.

“So, when I say, ‘Hey maybe we shouldn’t use that word,’ to be honest, I really don’t expect him to understand where I’m coming from because he’ll never feel what I feel when I turn on the TV and see however many people are taken down by the KKK or whatever group it was. He’ll never know that feeling that I have about that.

“And you can try to understand it, and he will still never understand it to the degree that I do. … It’s not to take a shot at the owners of these entities; it’s more so trying to help spark change to help others that may be similar to me, because he may feel the same way that I feel because I’m African-American.”

Green concluded that Cuban is wrong for calling his opinion wrong.

“You can’t say I’m dead wrong because you really don’t know how it feels to turn on that TV and see a young black man shot by a police officer and he was unarmed,” he said.

“You will never get that feeling, so it’s hard to say I’m wrong.”

Few people love a debate more than Mark Cuban, and the Dallas Mavericks owner took issue with recent comments Draymond Green made regarding how the term “owner” is used.

In the wake of Houston Texans owner Bob McNair referring to NFL players as “inmates,” Green took to Instagram to compare the business magnate to disgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. Green also inferred that labeling a team’s proprietor an “owner” is insulting to players.

“For starters, let’s stop using the word owner and maybe use the word chairman,” Green wrote. “To be owned by someone just sets a bad precedent to start. It sets the wrong tone. It gives one the wrong mindset.”

Cuban isn’t buying that, pointing out the nomenclature doesn’t refer to the ownership of people.

“For (Green) to try to turn it into something it’s not, is wrong,” Cuban told ESPN’s Tim MacMahon. “He owes the NBA an apology.”

He added: “We own equity, we don’t own people. And there’s a big difference … people who bust their ass and work hard and get a little bit lucky have enough money to buy enough shares of stock to buy a company.”

Cuban then proceeded to take a Big Ten-related shot at the Golden State Warriors forward (the Mavs owner is a Hoosier, Green a Spartan).

“Draymond can trash-talk on the court, but when he comes into our world, it doesn’t fly,” the tech billionaire said. “I guess it’s because he went to Michigan State and didn’t take any business classes, but you own equity. When you own a team, you own equity, shares of stock. That’s called ownership. Tell him if he wants to take classes at Indiana‘s business school, I’ll even pay for his classes and we’ll help him learn that stuff.”

NBA: Phoenix Suns at Dallas Mavericks

Colin Kaepernick may possibly be out of a job as a result of his on-field political protests, but at least one owner believes things would be different if he played another sport.

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban thinks the free-agent quarterback’s protest of “The Star-Spangled Banner” would’ve been embraced if he played in the NBA, saying that many basketball players have been supported by the league when voicing their political views.

“I don’t know what his status is in the NFL, but I’m glad the NBA doesn’t have a politician litmus test for our players,” Cuban told Rick Maese of The Washington Post. “I’d like to think we encourage our players to exercise their constitutional rights.”

A number of NBA teams staged their own protests during last year’s preseason, linking arms with one another in solidarity during the American national anthem.

“The NBA is such a global game,” Cuban wrote in an email, as quoted by Maese. “I think our players exposure to different political systems among their teammates may help them appreciate our country even more and encourage their participation.”

While NBA commissioner Adam Silver has often been supportive when his players take public stands on social issues, he said prior to last year’s regular season that standing for the national anthem was “the appropriate thing to do.”

dallas_mavericks_logo_by_balsavor-d3glw3g

The Dallas Mavericks may be entering a full-on rebuild, but the franchise likely would’ve treated this year’s offseason much differently had it been in the Eastern Conference, according to team owner Mark Cuban.

“We’re rebuilding, and there’s no question about it,” Cuban told ESPN during Sunday’s summer league game. “If we were in the East, we would not be rebuilding. We’d be handling things completely different.”

After whiffing on several big-name free agents in recent years, the Mavericks have taken a less aggressive approach this offseason, with longtime power forward Dirk Nowitzki serving as the team’s lone free-agent signing.

“I think I’m going to kidnap Adam Silver and not let him out until he moves us to the Eastern Conference,” Cuban joked. “Given where we are, given where the Warriors are, and what’s happening in the Western Conference, it kind of sealed what we have to do.”

Cuban hasn’t been afraid to share his thoughts on the imbalance in the two conferences, recently suggesting that the league should consider tweaking the current playoff format to help solve the disparity.