Posts Tagged ‘Attitude Era’

WWE is reportedly planning to add episodes of WCW Thunder to its on-demand Network service in the coming months (via PWInsider.com).

Thunder was World Championship Wrestling’s secondary show from 1998 to 2001, fulfilling a function broadly similar to that of SmackDown for WWE.

Airing on Thursday and, later, Wednesday evenings on TBS, its final broadcast came in March 2001, after which the company went defunct following a protracted period of financial difficulty.

After purchasing the rights to its video library, WWE has since made episodes of Nitro, the flagship WCW show, along with most pay-per-views, available to subscribers of its Network.

And Thunder, of which there were 146 episodes in total, now looks to be in the pipeline following unofficial reports from reputable industry insiders.

PWInsider also report that the much-anticipated “Table For 3” episode starring Ric Flair, Ricky Steamboat, and Sting will air on 11 September, after originally being postponed following The Nature Boy’s recent health scare.

The company is also said to be planning Hell in a Cell-themed Network programming later this year to coincide with October’s pay-per-view of the same name.

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Tammy “Sunny” Sytch was recently a guest on The Ross Report podcast with Jim Ross where she talked about the site she now works for, which is actually a members section on her own site.

“The way I came across it; I have some friends that are actually in the porn industry. We’ve been friends for years. When you are an artist, you get to know people from all walks of life and you get to know them for the type of people that they are. I don’t judge anybody; I’ve never judged anyone. Well, one of my good friends, her name is Kendra Lust, she’s a big name porn star. I’ve noticed on her page, she had this link to her page called, ‘Only Fans’, and I asked her about it and she said that she puts her porn content on the page, but she said anybody can do this page anybody that they want to do it,” Sytch explained.

“For instance, So-Cal Val does it as well, but in other ends of the spectrum. So, what I did was I am kind of in-between. So-Cal Val does it where she posts cute pictures of her posing in fashion, with her fiancé out in England, just like cute things like that, and she charges x-amount of dollars for it.

“Kendra Lust is the opposite where she shows her hardcore porn content for x-amount of dollars. I am in the middle of the two of them. I post mostly selfies and pictures; like, a lot of pictures that I have had on my phone for over the years. Sometimes it’s just cute selfies of me sitting in my car, or the beach, cooking, or doing something like that.

“Then I also take it to the next step with a little bit of racier content; it’s not XXX-porn, it’s more like Playboy type material,” Sytch explained. “Some selfies are just like a Playboy content; it’s not hardcore stuff, it’s not crazy, I think I only have four videos on there, with hundreds of selfies, or something like that, but that’s basically it. It’s harmless. I am able to charge a little more a month because I do show more than her; not taking anything away from her. She can show whatever she wants on her page, but she’s never shown any nudity in her career, so she charges a bit less, but I can charge more because of it. I charge a little more than Kendra Lust as well because I think her content is available already everywhere that they are not going to pay the high-end dollar just to see her stuff because they can see it for free on the internet.”

Sytch, who is a 2011 WWE Hall of Famer, has claimed she turned down an offer to pose for Playboy Magazine in 1997. She went on to pose nude for Missy Hyatt’s adult website Wrestling Vixxxens. Last year, Vivid Entertainment released a pornographic film featuring Sytch titled Sunny Side Up: In Through the Backdoor.

Also while on The Ross Report, Sytch was asked whether or not Joanie “Chyna” Laurer should be in the WWE Hall of Fame and why she is not enshrined.

“1,000% yes, [Joanie “Chyna” Laurer] should be in. I don’t think the X-rated porn should have anything to do with it; I really don’t,” said Sytch. “The way I look at that is she should be honored with what she did in professional wrestling; who cares what she did to make a living? Who cares? Somebody who moves on from professional wrestling do millions of things; from opening a business, to become teachers, or whatever, but she chose this, big deal!”

“Let’s give her the honor for what she did in the professional wrestling business. Not only was she one of my best friends towards the end, up until the time she died, but I think with the strides that she made in this business, I believe she really opened up the doors for women’s wrestling; not for Divas, but for the women’s wrestling industry. She was wrestling men and it was believable because she was such a big personality, such a huge human being, and she should be rewarded for what she did. Should her porn career matter after her wrestling career? Absolutely not!”

You can listen to the entire episode of Tammy “Sunny” Sytch on The Ross Report by clicking here.

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Former WWE superstar Al Snow says Vince McMahon gives his talent creative freedom, they just misunderstand.

The comments come in a new feature piece by The UK Sun where the publication examines what turned out to be Snow’s failed gimmicks in WWE before reinventing himself in ECW. Snow explained his first gimmicks in WWE – masked wrestlers known as Avatar and Shinobi in the mid-1990s — failed because he mishandled opportunities.

“Those were opportunities that I mishandled – I didn’t have enough of an understanding or knowledge to take full advantage,” said Snow. “At that time, I made the mistake that a lot of pro wrestlers do and pointed the finger at everyone else and and never took responsibility for not succeeding.”

Snow debuted in the then-WWF on the October 23, 1995 episode of Monday Night RAW as Avatar.

“I was given a stage and platform,” said Snow. “The Avatar character was new and different and neat, but knowing what I know now, I could have made that so much more than what it was.”

Snow, 54, believes it’s a misperception that Vince McMahon is burying younger talent with gimmicks. In fact, he says Vince gives talent creative freedom and wants them to succeed.

“Vince McMahon genuinely wants every wrestler to succeed. He’s a businessman,” Snow explained. “Not to mention his ego. The more his wrestlers succeed, the more his business succeeds, the more he succeeds – and he gets to take credit.”

“Guys misunderstand – in WWE Vince gives you creative freedom. Once in you step in that ring, there’s nothing Vince can do to help you get over – and there’s nothing he can do to stop you getting over.”

In the late 1990s, Snow was sent to ECW as part of a cross-promotion with WWE to combat the rise of WCW. He believes it was an opportunity where he was able to reinvent himself.

“I had to go away and reinvent myself,” said Snow. If I stayed in WWE I was never going to be in a better spot. Chris Candido spoke to Paul Heyman on my behalf, Heyman spoke to Vince, and I was kind of put on loan to ECW.”

Snow explained that he himself created the gimmick that put him on the map and that Heyman had nothing for him.

“Paul had no plans for me, so I was free to do whatever I wanted. I was trying to demonstrate that I had suffered a nervous breakdown, and had mental illness,” said Snow. “I was reading books on abnormal psychology and read a case study about a woman who heard voices from inanimate objects. She thought they were talking to her.”

This was the beginning of Snow’s legendary “head” gimmick where he came to the ring with a mannequin head and had the words “Help Me” written backwards on his forehead. As a result, crowd chants such as “We want Head” and “Head! Head! Head!” were born.

“I picked up this mannequin head that was backstage at a show and remembered Mick Foley jerking around in the car with this Styrofoam head he kept his mask on,” said Snow. “He would pretend it was his girlfriend and I thought, ‘You know I’m going to take this to the arena and talk to it.’ It just took off.”

Snow was recalled to WWE in 1998 where he brought the “head” gimmick back with him and he was inserted in hardcore programs. Snow went on to serve as a trainer for the original episodes of WWE Tough Enough and returned to full-time wrestling in 2006 when WWE resurrected the ECW brand. He then worked as a developmental trainer for the company through their affiliation with Ohio Valley Wrestling until 2008.

Snow has since worked on the independent circuit and served as an agent for Global Force Wrestling. He founded the Al Snow Wrestling Academy with multiple locations in the United Kingdom and has a new sportswear brand called Elbow X Collar. You can read more comments he made to The UK Sun by clicking here.

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USA Today’s “For the Win” blog has a feature on former WWE superstar Ivory, whose real name is Lisa Moretti. In the piece, Ivory discusses the accuracy of Netflix’s GLOW series and how far WWE has come.

“I thought it was a perfect thing to make a show from,” Ivory told For the Win of Netlix’s GLOW: The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling. “As far as telling our story and whether it was true to life, I thought they made a good mix. … I’m glad it’s not a documentary because it’s probably going to be way more entertaining with the really good writers and producers who put it together.”

Ivory competed in GLOW under the ring name Tina Ferrari, where she held the GLOW Championship, represented by a crown, not a belt.

GLOW was founded in 1986 and a reunion show was ran in Las Vegas in April 2012. While Ivory can’t pinpoint the exact reason for GLOW’s longevity, she has some ideas.

“I understand it now because I worked with the best of the best, but I didn’t get at first that people have an extreme passion for wrestling and the wrestlers. The fans are really intimately connected with each wrestler,” Ivory said. “I also think that anything that has a collection of women, there will be a sisterhood that people will relate to whether they are guys or girls. There is a power to sisterhood.”

“I also have come to learn that we had a large gay population that appreciates GLOW. In the mid-1980s, there wasn’t a representation of gayness on television,” Ivory continued. “Our glitter and our goofiness and our great costumes made in Vegas; the cheekiness and campiness of the show, it turns out little boys who were gay coveted our act. I went on one of the GLOW cruises last February and all the fans were gay guys. We had so much fun together. That was a new education to me.”

Ivory stepped away from the wrestling business in the early 1990s and was eventually brought to WWE in 1999 as one of the women that accompanied The Godfather to the ring. Vince McMahon ended up giving her a job and the Ivory character was born.

“They needed someone who looked good in a dress and could take a bump or two or three,” Ivory recalled.

While she went on to become a three-time WWE women’s champion, Ivory worked in an era where females in the company competed in gravy bowl matches, slop bouts and pillow fights.

“Everybody got fired or left and all the boobie girls came in and everything was very embarrassing, I thought,” she told For the Win. “At one point, the wrestling girls population referred to the GLOW girls, but at least we were falling down and trying to do legitimate wrestling. We didn’t have any legit training.”

“I don’t think they wanted the Divas Search girls to have any training. They wanted them to look sexy and stupid, unfortunately,” Ivory recalled. “A lot of those girls later on went to get trained and do great things in the wrestling world. I’m not badmouthing them. They were just put in a situation that was unfair.”

Ivory, 55, is thrilled to see the changes to how WWE pushes their female talent under the women’s wrestling revolution.

“They’re wrestling. They are entertaining to me now,” Ivory said of female superstars in WWE. “A few of them had different types of bodies. I was very pleased to see that things have come far, far away from the Diva Search days where it was, ‘Let’s have a bunch of girls in bikinis flop around and look stupid so the public can vote them on or off the show.'”

Ivory retired from professional wrestling in 2006. She was featured on WWE Network’s Table for 3, along fellow wrestlers Alundra Blayze and Molly Holly last January. You can read more comments from her exclusive interview with USA Today’s “For the Win” blog by clicking here.

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Source: Something To Wrestle With Bruce Prichard

On episode 51 of Something To Wrestle With Bruce Prichard, current Impact Wrestling on-air authority figure and pro wrestling podcaster Bruce Prichard talked about WINC alum Vince Russo’s WWE run. Notably, Prichard talked about Russo advocating for Triple H, the Madison Square Garden Curtain Call, Triple H and Chyna being a “package deal” behind-the-scenes, who wanted The New Age Outlaws in D-Generation X, and who came up with WWE “attitude”.

According to Prichard, Russo was the biggest advocate for Triple H early on while Vince McMahon and Jim Cornette used to say that ‘The Game’ was a midcarder at best.

“I do remember Corny and Vince McMahon saying that Triple H would be a midcard guy at best early on in his [pro wrestling] career and Russo was a huge proponent of Triple H. And I dare say that without Russo at the helm at the time, Hunter probably would not have gotten the breaks that he got at the time.”

Prichard continued, “yeah, [Russo was Triple H’s biggest advocate at the time] and then Vince McMahon became, but Hunter was one of those guys who was always around, always asking questions, and wanting to be a part of whatever he could do to learn. I liked Hunter because I always liked his attitude, just willing to do whatever it took to learn the [pro wrestling] business, but Russo was definitely pushing Hunter and had an awful lot of ideas for him.”

On the subject of the MSG Curtain Call, Prichard claimed that everyone was offended, not just him and Cornette, as was suggested by podcast co-host Conrad Thompson from reading excerpts of Russo’s own writings.

“It was simply a feeling of what they did being disrespectful to Vince [McMahon], being disrespectful to the memory of Vince’s dad doing it in the Garden, our home. It was something that hadn’t been done before and something everybody was upset about, not just me, not just Cornette, but Vince McMahon, pretty much every one of the boys who wasn’t involved in the Curtain Call.”

Moreover, Prichard stated that Triple H was punished in an upfront way for the Curtain Call and explained that McMahon decided not to go with Triple H for King Of The Ring because The Chairman did not feel like he could trust ‘The King Of Kings’.

“Hunter was punished and he was considered for King Of The Ring, but Vince didn’t feel like he could trust him at that point in time and he wanted Hunter to prove himself and Hunter did.”

During the podcast, Prichard confirmed Russo’s assertion that dealing with either Triple H or Chyna meant dealing with both of them, calling the pair a “package deal”.

“Probably so [Triple H had to be present for Chyna’s creative meetings with Russo] from his vantage point pitching stuff. Whatever Joanie was doing, she was with Hunter, so I’m sure Hunter wanted to be there. But they were also an item at the time, so they did everything together. Whenever I’d call either one of them, the other was usually there. It was kind of a team decision because they were a package deal.”

Another rumor Prichard attempted to dispel involved D-Generation X. Pro wrestling rumor and innuendo purports that ‘The Road Dogg’ Jesse James and ‘The Bad Ass’ Billy Gunn were not picked by Triple H and Shawn Michaels to join the group. Prichard recalled that Michaels wanted The New Age Outlaws for the stable.

“The guy that brought Billy [Gunn] and Road Dogg to Vince [McMahon]’s attention was Shawn Michaels who saw those two guys. They were singles. One was a Rockabilly and then Jesse James… It was Shawn Michaels who brought them to Vince and wanted them to be a part of DX and felt that they would be a great team together.”

Finally, Prichard credited McMahon with conceiving of the ‘attitude’ concept after fining Shawn Michaels for his vulgar and explicit antics.

“That’s where Vince McMahon coined the phrase ‘attitude’ because Shawn, in his defense, was like, ‘because I’ve got attitude, you’re going to fine me, blah, blah, blah?’ And that’s where Vince, I’ll never forget, Vince came back to us and said, ‘that’s attitude! That’s what we need. We need more attitude!'”

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Source: BBC Radio 1

Triple H appeared on BBC Radio 1 with Greg James today while in the U.K. During the appearance, Triple H talked about how they would often try to make The Undertaker laugh and break character during matches at non-televised events in the 90s. He brought up The Rock doing The People’s Elbow before it was a known move.

“You’re trying to make each other laugh and one night The Rock did The People’s Elbow,” Triple H recalled. “[It] wasn’t known as The People’s Elbow, it was known as ‘watch this move that’s going to make all of you lose it in your corners’.”

Triple H noted that the Rock would do the elbow move at a couple of events and then Mick Foley dared him to do it during a match on television, which would go on to become one of Rock’s trademark moves.

“These things morph in those ways, but they catch on,” Triple H said. “Trust me, we’re quick to go, ‘oooh, they like that, I’m sticking with that.'”

James described the People’s Elbow for the listeners, calling it a “ludicrous finishing move.” Triple H pointed out that he loved working with The Rock, but it was “the hokiest looking move ever.”

“You’ve gotta wait for like 20 minutes while he takes his elbow pad off and works the crowd,” Triple H said. “He runs back and forth, then he comes up and drops an elbow on you that looks like it barely touches you, except that a lot of times the point of his elbow hits you right in the mouth and you come up bleeding and you’re like, ‘how can you bust me open on that?’ It’s also so funny that you’re running away to the bank with it.”

WWE Hall of Famer Scott Hall appeared on Another Wrestling Podcast recently and discussed the state of wrestling today, the WWE Network, and his own cooking show.

When asked if he thought pro wrestling would ever get as big as it was in the Monday Night War era, Hall said there are a lot of other factors involved.

“The economy was different then, it was stronger. I think there were less entertainment options. There’s so many things now that people can view. There’s not just cable TV, there’s online. I think that cuts into it,” Hall said.

Hall also said that while pro wrestling shows aren’t necessarily doing the ratings that happened in the 1990s, he considers the WWE a much bigger company than in his era.

“Overall I think wrestling companies will get bigger. The WWE machine is a lot stronger than it was when I was there. When you go to TV, it’s unbelievable the production that’s going on. Then they have their Network cameras there filming guys filming guys,” said Hall.

The WWE Hall of Famer also said that he’s working on his own cooking show, and he’d like for it to be on the WWE Network.

“They’re stocking that Network full of shows,” Hall said. “I want to do a travel show. I’m working on a cooking show, I’m going to do some of it at Dallas Page’s performance center. I’m going to do a cooking show called Dude Food, where I show young guys how to eat good and clean, cheap.”