Posts Tagged ‘Attitude Era’

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USA Today’s “For the Win” blog has a feature on former WWE superstar Ivory, whose real name is Lisa Moretti. In the piece, Ivory discusses the accuracy of Netflix’s GLOW series and how far WWE has come.

“I thought it was a perfect thing to make a show from,” Ivory told For the Win of Netlix’s GLOW: The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling. “As far as telling our story and whether it was true to life, I thought they made a good mix. … I’m glad it’s not a documentary because it’s probably going to be way more entertaining with the really good writers and producers who put it together.”

Ivory competed in GLOW under the ring name Tina Ferrari, where she held the GLOW Championship, represented by a crown, not a belt.

GLOW was founded in 1986 and a reunion show was ran in Las Vegas in April 2012. While Ivory can’t pinpoint the exact reason for GLOW’s longevity, she has some ideas.

“I understand it now because I worked with the best of the best, but I didn’t get at first that people have an extreme passion for wrestling and the wrestlers. The fans are really intimately connected with each wrestler,” Ivory said. “I also think that anything that has a collection of women, there will be a sisterhood that people will relate to whether they are guys or girls. There is a power to sisterhood.”

“I also have come to learn that we had a large gay population that appreciates GLOW. In the mid-1980s, there wasn’t a representation of gayness on television,” Ivory continued. “Our glitter and our goofiness and our great costumes made in Vegas; the cheekiness and campiness of the show, it turns out little boys who were gay coveted our act. I went on one of the GLOW cruises last February and all the fans were gay guys. We had so much fun together. That was a new education to me.”

Ivory stepped away from the wrestling business in the early 1990s and was eventually brought to WWE in 1999 as one of the women that accompanied The Godfather to the ring. Vince McMahon ended up giving her a job and the Ivory character was born.

“They needed someone who looked good in a dress and could take a bump or two or three,” Ivory recalled.

While she went on to become a three-time WWE women’s champion, Ivory worked in an era where females in the company competed in gravy bowl matches, slop bouts and pillow fights.

“Everybody got fired or left and all the boobie girls came in and everything was very embarrassing, I thought,” she told For the Win. “At one point, the wrestling girls population referred to the GLOW girls, but at least we were falling down and trying to do legitimate wrestling. We didn’t have any legit training.”

“I don’t think they wanted the Divas Search girls to have any training. They wanted them to look sexy and stupid, unfortunately,” Ivory recalled. “A lot of those girls later on went to get trained and do great things in the wrestling world. I’m not badmouthing them. They were just put in a situation that was unfair.”

Ivory, 55, is thrilled to see the changes to how WWE pushes their female talent under the women’s wrestling revolution.

“They’re wrestling. They are entertaining to me now,” Ivory said of female superstars in WWE. “A few of them had different types of bodies. I was very pleased to see that things have come far, far away from the Diva Search days where it was, ‘Let’s have a bunch of girls in bikinis flop around and look stupid so the public can vote them on or off the show.'”

Ivory retired from professional wrestling in 2006. She was featured on WWE Network’s Table for 3, along fellow wrestlers Alundra Blayze and Molly Holly last January. You can read more comments from her exclusive interview with USA Today’s “For the Win” blog by clicking here.

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Source: Something To Wrestle With Bruce Prichard

On episode 51 of Something To Wrestle With Bruce Prichard, current Impact Wrestling on-air authority figure and pro wrestling podcaster Bruce Prichard talked about WINC alum Vince Russo’s WWE run. Notably, Prichard talked about Russo advocating for Triple H, the Madison Square Garden Curtain Call, Triple H and Chyna being a “package deal” behind-the-scenes, who wanted The New Age Outlaws in D-Generation X, and who came up with WWE “attitude”.

According to Prichard, Russo was the biggest advocate for Triple H early on while Vince McMahon and Jim Cornette used to say that ‘The Game’ was a midcarder at best.

“I do remember Corny and Vince McMahon saying that Triple H would be a midcard guy at best early on in his [pro wrestling] career and Russo was a huge proponent of Triple H. And I dare say that without Russo at the helm at the time, Hunter probably would not have gotten the breaks that he got at the time.”

Prichard continued, “yeah, [Russo was Triple H’s biggest advocate at the time] and then Vince McMahon became, but Hunter was one of those guys who was always around, always asking questions, and wanting to be a part of whatever he could do to learn. I liked Hunter because I always liked his attitude, just willing to do whatever it took to learn the [pro wrestling] business, but Russo was definitely pushing Hunter and had an awful lot of ideas for him.”

On the subject of the MSG Curtain Call, Prichard claimed that everyone was offended, not just him and Cornette, as was suggested by podcast co-host Conrad Thompson from reading excerpts of Russo’s own writings.

“It was simply a feeling of what they did being disrespectful to Vince [McMahon], being disrespectful to the memory of Vince’s dad doing it in the Garden, our home. It was something that hadn’t been done before and something everybody was upset about, not just me, not just Cornette, but Vince McMahon, pretty much every one of the boys who wasn’t involved in the Curtain Call.”

Moreover, Prichard stated that Triple H was punished in an upfront way for the Curtain Call and explained that McMahon decided not to go with Triple H for King Of The Ring because The Chairman did not feel like he could trust ‘The King Of Kings’.

“Hunter was punished and he was considered for King Of The Ring, but Vince didn’t feel like he could trust him at that point in time and he wanted Hunter to prove himself and Hunter did.”

During the podcast, Prichard confirmed Russo’s assertion that dealing with either Triple H or Chyna meant dealing with both of them, calling the pair a “package deal”.

“Probably so [Triple H had to be present for Chyna’s creative meetings with Russo] from his vantage point pitching stuff. Whatever Joanie was doing, she was with Hunter, so I’m sure Hunter wanted to be there. But they were also an item at the time, so they did everything together. Whenever I’d call either one of them, the other was usually there. It was kind of a team decision because they were a package deal.”

Another rumor Prichard attempted to dispel involved D-Generation X. Pro wrestling rumor and innuendo purports that ‘The Road Dogg’ Jesse James and ‘The Bad Ass’ Billy Gunn were not picked by Triple H and Shawn Michaels to join the group. Prichard recalled that Michaels wanted The New Age Outlaws for the stable.

“The guy that brought Billy [Gunn] and Road Dogg to Vince [McMahon]’s attention was Shawn Michaels who saw those two guys. They were singles. One was a Rockabilly and then Jesse James… It was Shawn Michaels who brought them to Vince and wanted them to be a part of DX and felt that they would be a great team together.”

Finally, Prichard credited McMahon with conceiving of the ‘attitude’ concept after fining Shawn Michaels for his vulgar and explicit antics.

“That’s where Vince McMahon coined the phrase ‘attitude’ because Shawn, in his defense, was like, ‘because I’ve got attitude, you’re going to fine me, blah, blah, blah?’ And that’s where Vince, I’ll never forget, Vince came back to us and said, ‘that’s attitude! That’s what we need. We need more attitude!'”

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Source: BBC Radio 1

Triple H appeared on BBC Radio 1 with Greg James today while in the U.K. During the appearance, Triple H talked about how they would often try to make The Undertaker laugh and break character during matches at non-televised events in the 90s. He brought up The Rock doing The People’s Elbow before it was a known move.

“You’re trying to make each other laugh and one night The Rock did The People’s Elbow,” Triple H recalled. “[It] wasn’t known as The People’s Elbow, it was known as ‘watch this move that’s going to make all of you lose it in your corners’.”

Triple H noted that the Rock would do the elbow move at a couple of events and then Mick Foley dared him to do it during a match on television, which would go on to become one of Rock’s trademark moves.

“These things morph in those ways, but they catch on,” Triple H said. “Trust me, we’re quick to go, ‘oooh, they like that, I’m sticking with that.'”

James described the People’s Elbow for the listeners, calling it a “ludicrous finishing move.” Triple H pointed out that he loved working with The Rock, but it was “the hokiest looking move ever.”

“You’ve gotta wait for like 20 minutes while he takes his elbow pad off and works the crowd,” Triple H said. “He runs back and forth, then he comes up and drops an elbow on you that looks like it barely touches you, except that a lot of times the point of his elbow hits you right in the mouth and you come up bleeding and you’re like, ‘how can you bust me open on that?’ It’s also so funny that you’re running away to the bank with it.”

WWE Hall of Famer Scott Hall appeared on Another Wrestling Podcast recently and discussed the state of wrestling today, the WWE Network, and his own cooking show.

When asked if he thought pro wrestling would ever get as big as it was in the Monday Night War era, Hall said there are a lot of other factors involved.

“The economy was different then, it was stronger. I think there were less entertainment options. There’s so many things now that people can view. There’s not just cable TV, there’s online. I think that cuts into it,” Hall said.

Hall also said that while pro wrestling shows aren’t necessarily doing the ratings that happened in the 1990s, he considers the WWE a much bigger company than in his era.

“Overall I think wrestling companies will get bigger. The WWE machine is a lot stronger than it was when I was there. When you go to TV, it’s unbelievable the production that’s going on. Then they have their Network cameras there filming guys filming guys,” said Hall.

The WWE Hall of Famer also said that he’s working on his own cooking show, and he’d like for it to be on the WWE Network.

“They’re stocking that Network full of shows,” Hall said. “I want to do a travel show. I’m working on a cooking show, I’m going to do some of it at Dallas Page’s performance center. I’m going to do a cooking show called Dude Food, where I show young guys how to eat good and clean, cheap.”

Source: The Steve Austin Show

On a recent episode of The Steve Austin Show, “Stone Cold” Steve Austin interviewed Sean “X-Pac” Waltman. During the podcast, the two talked about Glenn Jacobs, also known as Kane. Also, Waltman recalled a story of working with Kane during their feud over Tori. With respect to Waltman’s feud with Kane, Waltman called it a hell of a run and said that it was really great working with Glenn him.

With that said, Waltman admitted it was a lot of work, as a small heel working against a monster babyface has to “pull out everything, but the kitchen sink.”

Austin noted that Kane is one of the nicest people in the professional wrestling business. In response, Waltman told a story about hitting Kane with the ring bell three nights in a row and Kane needing stitches each of those nights, but never telling him about his hospital visits.

“Finally, Paul Bearer told me, ‘this is the third night in a row that he had to go get [stitches]; he won’t tell you,” Waltman said. “I’m like, ‘come on!’ I felt like such a heel!”

Source: Digital Spy

Mark Henry was recently interviewed by Digital Spy to promote the new Attitude Era book. Below are some highlights:

If there was anything in the Attitude Era that went too far:

“Seeing Mankind and Undertaker in the Cell, jumping off the top. I thought it was a little much. But it’s the moments in our business that make up the history. They told a complete story that there’s no limit to what we can do. And that’s what I got out of it.”

Brock Lesnar ending The Undertaker’s WrestleMania streak:

“If you’re going to lose to somebody losing to a guy like Brock Lesnar is not something that people will laugh at. Brock is arguably one of the top ten fighters on Earth. He’s young, he’s big, he’s powerful and he’s fearless. He’s a dominate entity in sports entertainment. If you’re going to lose to someone it sounds like a pretty good option.”

If the Nation of Domination would work today:

“I think it would be taken very strongly. I think it would succeed. But it’s a different time, and the militance and the collective thought process on people wanting to turn things because of color is always gonna be there, but is less prevalent now than it ever was. I think it would work but it would go through some struggle.”

Mark Suleymanov recently conducted an interview with former WWE superstar Val Venis. During the interview, the two discussed the Attitude Era, a funny Owen Hart story, Venis’ medical marijuana venture and more.

Below are some interview highlights

On Marijuana:

“It’s actually saved my life. I had six pins put in my shoulder, can’t get my elbows straight anymore, they’re always hurting. Doctors had me on anti-inflammatory’s and pain pills for years and you can’t take those things for the rest of your life without suffering serious consequences. And when I found out about marijuana and started utilizing that instead, in 2008, I came off all pharmaceuticals and never looked back,” said Venis. “I could smoke marijuana and eat marijuana for the rest of my life and never suffer any liver disease or kidney failure due to pills. The pills will get you every single time, with marijuana, you could be 110-years-old and still smoke it.”

Owen Hart story:

“There was one time when we watched Owen, he had a driver and he was in the passenger seat and Jeff Jarrett was in the backseat behind Owen. And as they are going up the ramp to drive out from the bottom of the arena, all you hear on the top of the roof of the car is ‘whack!’ And Owen looks over to the driver, he says ‘that guy up there just threw a rock down on your car.’ So, the guy stops the car on the ramp, gets out of the car, runs up the ramp, runs around the rail and charges at the guy Owen pointed at. Well, a cop steps out in front of the driver and says ‘whoa, this guy didn’t throw any rock, the guy with the blonde hair in the car hit the roof of your car with his hand. And when the driver looks over the rail to look at Owen, Owen turns around and says ‘Jeff, why did you hit the top of the car?’ and put all the heat on Jeff.”