Posts Tagged ‘Advice’

 

Ricky Steamboat spoke with Ring Rust Radio on training today’s wrestlers, wanting to turn heel, and his WrestleMania III match against “Macho Man” Randy Savage. Here are some of the highlights:

Since leaving your in-ring career behind, you have focused on working with younger talent. How much pride do you take in bestowing your knowledge on the next generation of wrestlers?

“Right now in my life, it’s what I do a lot of and happy to do it. I remember the first couple of years when I was coming up through the ranks, some of the old-timers would take me aside after the match and critique me. I understand today’s guys, a lot of guys when they get in the ring, they’re looking across the ring at a guy with the same amount of ring time.

Some guys six months, some guys one year, some guys two or three years, but when I was coming up, most nights I was looking across the ring at a 15- or 20-year journeyman. Every night he was taking me to school and he knew what his position was and it was to pass the torch and hopefully by doing this, he would help to keep the business going. Help bring up guys that were green and rookies and show them the way. I find out at this point in time in my life, this is what I’m doing.

I understand that wrestling now has changed as opposed to what it was when I worked, but I still think you can apply some of the things that I talk about and just put you 2018 twist on it and still make it work. It is a lot of pride for me and it’s a way for me giving back. A way I am passing the torch and hopefully some talent will look back at the day I was there teaching them, reflect on that and hopefully they will understand how it helped.”

Is there any part of you that wishes you would have had even a brief run as a heel, and how do you feel you would’ve fared in that role?

“I’ll tell you a true story. Back in ’91, I went to Vince and Pat Patterson and asked to do a turn and they both shut me down without hesitation. They said it would not work, I was the premier babyface, and I told them that I’ve been in the ring with the best feels in the business. I actually believed that I could work as a heel because I’ve been in the ring with the best of them.

They said bottom line, it would probably hurt your career and they shut it down. Now, at the time guys I was a bit turned off. I was a bit disgruntled because I wanted to be able to work as a heel. At that time, I had been in the business I was approaching around 17 years and I knew I was get into the twilight of my career and I just wanted to be able to experience working on the dark side. Being able to feel what that’s like and I was upset about not being able to do it at the time. Looking back at it now, I’m happy and pleased that they did talk me out of it and not allow it.

Like you said earlier, one of the few guys in the business that wrestled close to 20 years actively and stayed the same way as he started in the business. There’s just a few of us that have done that and I’m happy to say that I’m one of those few guys now. I reflect back and I’m happy that I was turned down.”

In regards to your WrestleMania III match against Randy Savage, is there something specific that stands out to you about that match that perhaps fans may not be aware of or you feel goes overlooked?

“A lot of Q&A’s that I do at appearances, comic-cons, or conventions, they always ask about that match and I’ll say that match was completely scripted and put together. The reason was Randy and I did not have any opportunity to work with each other leading up to WrestleMania III. A lot of main event guys are able to work with their partner and fine-tune their match before a big pay-per-view, but Vince wanted my debut to be on that day. The only thing we could do was put together something that would work just from gut feeling.

We didn’t know if it was going to work with the fans and we didn’t have a chance to try and fine-tune it. Thank God what we did put together worked. I think the biggest thing I wanted was to make it a championship match. That was my answer to Randy because he is asked, ‘What do you want to do Dragon?’ So, I told Randy that we got to make it a championship match. He told me that I should go after his throat since he came off the top rope with the bell on my throat. I said what I kind of think is everybody would expect that.

If we could have a moment in the match where I get a little payback and then let’s move on to making it a championship match. What I meant by that was we had 21 false finishes in a match that went less than 17 minutes, and I thought the story that we were trying to tell here Randy is that I’m going after your belt, and you’re trying to hold onto it. So, with all those false finishes and finally number 22 was the final 1, 2, 3. We were talking about my dive off the top I did and I think everybody again would kind of expect that so let’s catch them out of the blue. It was a simple he picked me up for slam and I hit him with a small package.”

Steamboat also discussed more about babyface work today. You can check out the full interview by clicking here.

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Chelsea Green, f.k.a. Laurel Van Ness in Impact Wrestling, was the special guest on Women’s Pro Wrestling Weekly with TK Trinidad and Evan T Match.  Here are more highlights that they sent to us:

Coming up with the Laurel Van Ness character:

“I started on Impact Wrestling as just a typical mean girl, Regina George [character in Mean Girls movie] knockoff. I was bored with it. I feel like that is what every girl falls into when they are trying to be a heel girl character. I just find it overdone, and unless you can do it really well it becomes overdone. They kind of threw me a bone when they gave me a storyline with Allie and husband Braxton Sutter where I was able to get married. As we were planning this marriage segment and I am going to be left at the altar, I thought to myself, okay, how can I make this as dramatic as possible and make this as different and ridiculous. At this stage, nobody is talking about my character. Nobody is talking about a girl that is a typical blonde, mean girl that is on television. That is just not something people care about. When we got into doing the segment on television, I was the most dramatic human on the planet. I would stay crying. I would drink champagne. I would throw flowers around, and when I got into the back when the segment was done, Dutch [Mantell] was there saying, ‘oh my gosh, that was absolutely brilliant!’. ‘We need to film something, anything, where you are continuing on this mental breakdown.’ That is what it looks like you are doing in the ring, you are having a mental breakdown. So, we sat down in the makeup room and I sat on the floor and he told me to smear my lipstick, and I said that it isn’t going to work because my lips are my skin color so it’s not going to work. He told me to put on red lipstick, but I told him that during the scene I didn’t have red lipstick on, he said to me to put it on and smear it. He then told me to wet my face a little so my makeup can be smeared. He said to act crazy and sing a song and do something crazy. I am sitting there with makeup smeared, sitting on the ground with no shoes on. Being an absolute nutcase. I am not joking, I didn’t think that it was ever going to be used, but all of it aired and it was one of the most-watched segments of that year. From there, we just carried on the craziness.”

How boyfriend Zack Ryder helped her develop the character:

“I think the great thing is about my character is that talking with someone, someone always has some sort of suggestion because they can relate my character with a crazy ex-girlfriend, or a psycho mom or psycho sister, or a drunk-hot mess that they saw at the bar last week. You can relate it to whoever you want. With that comes these amazing suggestions from people. I get caught up in this character thinking that I have to go one way or another to the point that I believe that I need to be this drunk girl that never wrestles, but my boyfriend [Zack Ryder] takes a step back and says to me that I can take this character into whatever direction I want it to go. I should also stop making the character drunk, but instead, I should make her a psycho. You need a snapping point, and with that snapping point how would the crowd know that I snapped? He suggested having my lipstick slipped to me and that becomes my ‘thing.’ That is my weapon so the crowd knows that this is it, she is turning it up, and the match doesn’t become what it was before. Those little kind of pointers is where he helps me with. Where in the match I should make it happen and where it should happen, but I mean, really, there are fans that help me with this. There are fans that help me with certain suggestions where even I hadn’t thought of it and I end up using it.”

Dating Zack Ryder:

“At first we based on our relationship on everything but work, and I think that is what helped us and how we fell in love because on our first date we didn’t talk about wrestling. Like I said, I don’t know wrestling. I don’t know the things he has done in the past. He tells me stories, but I am not sitting there thinking that I already knew that and that I was watching it on YouTube. I genuinely have no idea, but I love it and am interested in it.

“Of course, it is hard when we are on the road. Last week he was in Europe so we didn’t see each other for several weeks, but on the other hand, we are both doing the same thing and we are doing this together on the same team. I know what he is going through when he can’t call me and vice versa. I believe it is the best thing in the world to trust each other. I know when he is not texting me, I know he is busy at work and I am busy too, so it’s great. It’s hard. It’s a job, but that is kind of what every relationship is and you just try to make it work. This past week it was harder than usual because he wasn’t home all week while I am sitting at home Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, and Thursday, but the minute the weekend hits I am off to the indie shows, I am off doing business so it is totally fine. It definitely is tough when one person is really busy and the other is sitting at home, but we rarely have that, so we have been lucky.”

The Miz was recently a guest on Busted Open Radio, below are some highlights:

His confidence rising over the years:

“It feels like now that I have been in WWE for over 12 years, I have developed this confidence where whatever situation I am in I know what to do. I don’t think I have had that type of confidence. I think that it takes a lot of time; a lot of matches and a lot of years to develop that type of confidence where no matter what situation you are in, you know exactly what to do, get the crowd to wherever you want them and be so confident that even if you fail it is still a success.”

Being a locker room leader:

“No. I don’t think I will ever be a locker room leader like The Undertaker or John Cena. That is just not my role. I am not someone that sits in the back watching the monitor and observing everyone. I have to get in the ring to feel exactly how you are. That is how I teach. I teach by example, instead of saying to them what they did wrong. I need to get in the ring with them and be able to feel what the are doing, so that is how I am able to teach. I am not one of those people that people go to and people ask for my advice. I don’t know, it’s tough for me to give a person advice when I wasn’t in the ring with them. I don’t know what their mindset is. I don’t know why they did what they did and when they did it. I have to hear an audience, and feel an audience to know exactly why I am doing something.”

High and low points when starting out in wrestling:

“I always thought the lowest point was developmental. I remember waking up at Deep South Wrestling and telling myself everyday that my body was drained, my mind was drained both physically and emotionally. Everyday I woke up thinking to myself that I can do this for one more day. Then I got up to the main roster and I thought, well, nobody likes me. I tried to find a place to change because I was kicked out [of the locker room]. That was obviously a low point. I will never forget not being able to find a restroom backstage so I went out to where the audience was. I will never forget going to the bathroom and little kids going, ‘Oh my God. It’s The Miz!’ There is no worse feeling than wanting to portray a star in WWE and you are in a bathroom and little kids are looking at you like, oh wow. That was a low point. The high point is obviously main eventing WrestleMania. High point right now is any time I went out with my wife. Anytime you can have your significant other next to you and you can sit there and look at each other and be around eachother 100% of the time. I mean, we just had a daughter. That is definitely the highest point of my life. The fact that I am not with her and I am in Corpus Christi, Texas. I am at the point in my life now where any time I come home when I see her and she sees me she smiles everytime. This is the hardest time in my life by not being with her all the time. Maryse is absolutely an incredible mother. I didn’t pick up really that quickly. I am not a natural at being a dad. It is something that I had to work hard for. I always had to work hard at everything. That is exactly what I am doing, just doing the best that I can. Whenever I come home I want to just put her in my arms and keep her in my arms. People are like, oh, what about changing? I love changing. I love giving her baths. I love dancing and singing to her and doing all these stuff you wouldn’t expect a WWE Superstar to do.”

 

CM Punk took part in a UFC 225 open workout media scrum ahead of his upcoming fight with Mike Jackson (0-1) on Saturday in Chicago. While Punk made the transition from WWE to UFC, his friend Ronda Rousey did the opposite, going from the UFC to WWE. During the scrum, Punk was asked if he spoke to Rousey before she made her WWE debut at WrestleMania 34 this past April.

“The only thing I’ve told her is to just have fun,” Punk said. “I don’t know what it’s like back there in this current environment. I know she’d probably get treated differently, just as like I know I get probably treated differently here. The only thing I ever told her is that I know you’ve got a lot of people telling you, ‘do this, don’t do this.’ I just said, whatever you do, when you go out there for WrestleMania, make sure you have fun. Period.”

Punk noted that he did not watch Rousey’s WrestleMania match, where she teamed with Kurt Angle to defeat Triple H and Stephanie McMahon, although he saw some clips “here and there.” He noted that it’s hard for him to watch WWE because of how overproduced it has gotten.

“When I say it’s hard for me to watch wrestling, it’s not like an anxiety thing, it’s not like, ‘I can’t do it!’ I literally can’t get through eight seconds without being like, ‘OK, I’m bored, I gotta watch something else.’ They’ve got like… it’s like going to a baseball game at CitiField. I like Wrigley Field, it’s old school. Going to a baseball game at CitiField, it’s like a guy takes ball four and they blow off fireworks and there’s LED screens on everything and wrestling now is completely like that. There’s LED screens everywhere and there’s flashing lights and I feel like I’m gonna have like a seizure.”

Punk noted that he doesn’t watch wrestling outside of WWE either, stating that there’s a “disconnect.”

“I don’t know why,” Punk stated. “Subconsciously, there’s like a disconnect. I see clips of stuff, like I know Kenny Omega is the hot guy and he’s probably one of the better guys in the world right now, but it’s the same thing. I’ll watch clips of matches, I don’t see myself watching like a full match. I just can’t do it.”

Punk said that today’s product is too glossy, but it’s been that way for awhile. He noted that he liked the old school pro wrestling feel at house shows back in the day.

“I think it’s definitely too glossy, but it’s been like that for a very long time,” Punk said. “My jam was house shows before they started calling them live events, where it was a curtain and a ring and a light above the ring. That was my jam, that was my world, that was where I liked to thrive.”

When asked if he preferred the PWG-style more, Punk said that the promotion was very different when he worked there, adding that he might have had the worst PWG match of all time.

Tenille Dashwood recently spoke with Scott Fishman for TV Insider; you can read a few highlights below:

Tenille Dashwood comments on her current run with Ring Of Honor: 

“I feel revived and alive again with wrestling. I started this because I love wrestling. Back when I was younger in Australia, I wanted to be a wrestler and loved what I did with WWE.

“It’s completely different now. It’s not five minutes on TV where I’m asked to do such and such. It’s having competitive singles matches every night. There are different opponents every night. I’m meeting new people and improving my own skills every time by working with different people in the ring. It got me going again.”

Tenille reveals advice Cody Rhodes has given her: 

“We talked about how to go about things and make sure I enjoy it and taking advantage of the opportunities I have now. Just to do the things I haven’t been able to do in years.

With WWE you don’t always get to do things the way you like to do them, so now he said to remember that I’m in control and can do things my way. To be doing things for a reason and to wrestle around the world. And not to do it for job, but to do it because you love and enjoy it and travel and meet people and wrestle. It was to remember all that.”

Dashwood comments on The IIconics’ Smackdown debut: 

“I kind of knew it was coming, but I told them not to tell me if it’s happening because I wanted to be in the moment. I called Peyton out. I called her a liar. I said, ‘You’re not at home right now.’ She was like, ‘Oops you got me.’ I said, ‘No, don’t tell me!’ I have been friends with those girls for years.

“I just talked to the girls yesterday. They are on the European tour right now. We always catch up. We stay in contact. They come over my house, and we go into the hot tub. We’re good friends. I’m so excited for them. Seeing them really warms my heart doing what they love. I know what it feels like to have those big moments and that feeling. So, I’m happy for them.”

Cesaro was interviewed by The City Pages to promote this Friday’s RAW live event at the Target Center in Minneapolis. Cesaro & Sheamus will defend the RAW Tag Team Championship at the show against Seth Rollins & Roman Reigns. Below are a couple of highlights:

Destroying a beach ball in the crowd at last year’s SummerSlam pay-per-view:

“Excuse my language, but fudge beach balls. Seriously. That’s absolutely disrespectful. We were wrestling for the Tag Team Championships, and you want to play with a beach ball? Get the hell out of here. Go. Leave the arena, and don’t come back. I think every person that brings a beach ball into a WWE arena should get ejected for life.”

Advice for wrestlers who feel they aren’t getting the credit or booking they deserve:

“First of all, nothing happens overnight. Everyone thinks you become successful overnight or you get good overnight, but that does not happen. It’s always a long road. I came to the WWE after a long time on the independents, traveling and wrestling all over the world for 12 years. I’ve been in WWE for six years now. For some people, that success happens fast, but for some people, it doesn’t. It takes a while. You just have to be consistent and work hard. And you have to believe in yourself.”

Cesaro also discussed possibly reuniting with Kassius Ohno, his chemistry with Sheamus, his in-ring rivalry with Seth Rollins and more. You can read the full interview by clicking here.

With only four-and-a-half years as a pro wrestler and less than two on the main roster, Alexa Bliss has exhibited a meteoric rises in WWE. Not even five months after her main roster debut, Bliss defeated Becky Lynch to become the SmackDown Live Women’s Champion. She held the title for two months, but regained just over a week after she lost it to become two-time champion.

Just three weeks after she was drafted to Raw, Bliss defeated Bayley for the Women’s Championship, becoming the first person to win the title on both brands. Bliss lost at SummerSlam to Sasha Banks, but won it back just eight days later on Raw and has held the title ever since.

Bliss was able to outlast Mickie James, Sasha Banks, Bayley, Sonya Deville, and Mandy Rose to win the first-ever women’s Elimination Chamber match. In addition to her other accomplishments, Bliss will walk in this year’s WrestleMania as the Raw Women’s Champion, and walked into last year’s WrestleMania as SmackDown Live Women’s Champion.

During her promo following her win at Elimination Chamber, Bliss was able to completely turn the crowd around from cheers to boos with one single line, proving to everyone how good of a heel she is. This was one of many times that Bliss was able to elicit jeers from the crowd after initial cheers.

Bliss was recently interviewed by The Detroit News to promote her upcoming Rawappearance at the Little Caesars Arena. Bliss explained that she was very shy before playing the character that the WWE Universe see in the ring.

“Before I was portraying the character Alexa Bliss, I was very shy, very uncomfortable with playing a bad guy or showing any emotion, really,” said Bliss. “Now when I’m in the ring or doing a speaking segment, I get so wrapped up in the character that I don’t even notice I’m doing it. It’s a natural feeling for me.”

Being inspired by NXT General Manager William Regal on how to be a heel, Bliss was taught how to use real-life observations to add layers to her character. Bliss explained, “[Regal] would sit and watch people in airports and out in public and he would study their mannerisms, and he’d say if they bothered him, chances are they’d bother other people.”

One observation in particular helped her go to a deeper level of being an obnoxious heel, and to know how to turn a crowd around to jeer her.

“I saw how other people were looking at this child, screaming his head off, kicking and screaming in the store, and the poor mother was just mortified and trying to get her son to stop,” said Bliss. “I was like, ‘that’s gold. I’m using that.'”

This temper-tantrum character that Bliss displays has assisted her in being one of the top names in the women’s division, and head to her second straight WrestleMania as champion.

Source: The Detroit News


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