Posts Tagged ‘Adam Silver’

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Fourteen of the NBA’s 30 franchises lost money last season before receiving revenue-sharing cash from the league, and nine of those teams still ended up in the red after that, according to confidential financial records obtained by ESPN’s Brian Windhorst and Zach Lowe.

The report appears to confirm suspicions that despite record income from national television contracts, some teams are having trouble turning a profit – and not just in small markets.

The nine franchises to reportedly come out in the red, by the league’s accounting, after revenue sharing are: the Atlanta Hawks, Brooklyn Nets, Cleveland Cavaliers, Detroit Pistons, Memphis Grizzlies, Milwaukee Bucks, Orlando Magic, San Antonio Spurs, and Washington Wizards.

The Spurs and Cavaliers may raise eyebrows given their combined runs of success, but it was already widely reported the Cavs lost $40 million during their 2015-16 championship season – due in part to a $54-million luxury tax bill.

At the end of the day, small cities such as Memphis and Milwaukee cannot compare to markets like Los Angeles. However, Brooklyn is part of New York City, and Washington and Atlanta rank as the nation’s seventh- and 10th-largest media markets, respectively.

At least one owner brought up the idea of expansion as a way to increase team income, the report states. An expansion fee – likely over $1 billion per team – would be divvied equally among NBA owners and not subject to the 50-50 basketball-related income split with players under the collective bargaining agreement.

Commissioner Adam Silver is on record as saying expansion is not a priority, although markets such as Seattle may be soon waiting in the wings for a new team. Relocating less profitable franchises is another option, something a handful of richer owners have suggested, according to Windhorst and Lowe.

The chasm between the NBA’s most profitable and weaker franchises will be discussed at the league’s next Board of Governors meeting at the end of September, sources told ESPN.

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The NBA is trying to solve the problem of tanking by taking away the main incentive behind the controversial team-building strategy.

The league is aggressively pursuing lottery reform and could vote changes into legislation before the start of the 2017-18 season, according to ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski.

The Competition Committee is expected to vote on points of reform, before sending a formal recommendation to the Board of Governors for the final decision.

NBA commissioner Adam Silver is strongly advocating for draft lottery reform measures to disincentivize tanking by lowering the worst teams’ chances of having the highest odds at the best picks. Proposed changes would also see higher odds for lottery teams making a jump up or down in the draft order.

Smaller markets have opposed lottery reform in the past since a restrictive draft system is their only avenue to recruit elite talent. Free agency typically siphons stars from smaller to bigger destinations, which puts an added premium on drafting.

The current system gives the team with the worst record a 25 percent chance at winning the first overall pick and a 100 percent chance at picking in the top four. Odds for higher picks decrease as records improve, as in there’s an incentive to lose, which is why some teams try as hard as possible to field a noncompetitive team in hopes of maximizing their lottery chances.

Some organizations like the Philadelphia 76ers, Sacramento Kings, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns, and New York Knicks have been given high lottery picks many years in a row while making little tangible progress to improve their records.

It’s unclear as to when the changes would be put into place. Given that the league’s 30 teams are all operating on their own timelines, it could potentially be difficult to find an amicable time to implement changes at an agreed time.

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Adam Silver believes that if a team is invited to the White House, it should go.

When the Golden State Warriors won the title last month, they indicated they were undecided on whether they’ll visit President Donald Trump.

Portland Trail Blazers shooting guard C.J. McCollum recently asked the NBA commissioner if he thinks attending those visits should be up to the league, team, or individual players.

“I definitely don’t think it should be a league decision,” Silver replied in the interview for The Players’ Tribune. “I don’t think we should be directing teams or players to go to the White House. It’s my view that if invited, our teams should go to the White House. Regardless of people’s personal political views, I think that these institutions are bigger than any individual politician or any individual elected official.

“And it concerns me that something like going to the White House after winning a championship – something that’s been a great tradition – would become one that is partisan.

“I will say, though, even though I think that teams should make decisions as organizations, that I would also respect an individual player’s decision not to go.”

Stephen Curry, David West, and Andre Iguodala have all been critical of the 45th president, with the latter straight up saying he wouldn’t go to the White House this year. Head coach Steve Kerr has also spoken out against Trump’s principles in the past, but he did say his team should still consider visiting the White House.

When the Dubs won the title in 2015, they visited then-POTUS Barack Obama.

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Seattle could someday have an NBA team again.

In a Players’ Tribune interview with Portland Trail Blazers shooting guard C.J. McCollum last week, commissioner Adam Silver said it’s possible the league will bring a franchise back to the city, but he doesn’t know when.

“I think it’s just a question of when the right time is to seriously start thinking about expansion,” said Silver.

“I don’t want to put a precise timeline on it, but it’s inevitable at some point that we’ll start looking at the growth of franchises. That’s always been the case in this league, and Seattle will no doubt be on a short list of cities we’ll look at,” he added.

The Seattle SuperSonics entered the league in 1967-68 and captured an NBA championship in 1979. The club relocated to Oklahoma City in 2008 and became the Thunder.

Several Sonics greats have been strong proponents of the city regaining a team. Gary Payton said last year that Seattle “deserves” an NBA team and he’d be interested in becoming an owner, while Ray Allen echoed those sentiments in May.

“I still can’t believe that there is no basketball in Seattle,” he wrote in a post on Instagram. “This city is too great not to have a hoops squad. Come on everybody we need to rally and bring the NBA back to Seattle.”

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The Dallas Mavericks may be entering a full-on rebuild, but the franchise likely would’ve treated this year’s offseason much differently had it been in the Eastern Conference, according to team owner Mark Cuban.

“We’re rebuilding, and there’s no question about it,” Cuban told ESPN during Sunday’s summer league game. “If we were in the East, we would not be rebuilding. We’d be handling things completely different.”

After whiffing on several big-name free agents in recent years, the Mavericks have taken a less aggressive approach this offseason, with longtime power forward Dirk Nowitzki serving as the team’s lone free-agent signing.

“I think I’m going to kidnap Adam Silver and not let him out until he moves us to the Eastern Conference,” Cuban joked. “Given where we are, given where the Warriors are, and what’s happening in the Western Conference, it kind of sealed what we have to do.”

Cuban hasn’t been afraid to share his thoughts on the imbalance in the two conferences, recently suggesting that the league should consider tweaking the current playoff format to help solve the disparity.

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The NBA is in no hurry to address the issue of conference imbalance.

It was reported recently that multiple Western Conference team owners reached out to the league to propose ways to solve the power disparity, with their half of the league being so much stronger than the East.

It’s a problem the NBA has had for some time, and delved into two years ago only to find that abolishing conferences would be infeasible.

“We concluded that given all the focus on sports science, health of our players, impact of travel, it didn’t make sense, at least at this time, to move to a balanced schedule, because again, we play an imbalanced schedule,” commissioner Adam Silver said Wednesday at the Board of Governors presser, as quoted by ASAP Sports.

“Teams in the East obviously play each other more than teams in the West, and the notion is if you’re going to see one through 16, the only fair way to do it is then have a balanced schedule throughout the season.”

Silver explained that balancing out the schedule league-wide would necessitate far too much travel.

“The conclusion was that at least given the state of travel, the state of science on travel, we’re better off staying in the conference system the way we have it, and of course same implications for the playoffs; the notion, again, of having teams crisscrossing the country in the first round didn’t seem to make sense to our teams,” he added.

That said, the NBA isn’t ruling out the possibility of someday realigning conferences or changing the playoff format. In fact, Silver said he assumed the league will eventually look into it again.

“I think for the league, I think many of us felt a 1-through-16 playoff made more sense. And maybe there’s also the potential – it’s in some ways a separate issue, should you reseed after every round as some leagues do? I think those are the things we’ll continue to look at, but it’s not at the top of the agenda right now.”

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Basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar kept up his criticism of LaVar Ball on Friday, saying that the publicity-seeking hoops dad is cheapening the college game.

“Everybody knows about his sons because he has been able to hype them,” Abdul-Jabbar told Philadelphia radio station 97.5 The Fanatic. “But I don’t think that’s good for college basketball. It looks like it’s a huckster show. And that bothers me, you know. You have people going those lengths to promote their kids. I don’t get it.”

The 70-year-old Hall of Famer has been critical of Ball before, saying last month that he doesn’t think LaVar is doing his sons any good. Like Abdul-Jabbar, Lonzo Ball starred at UCLA and could also end up playing for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Abdul-Jabbar, who has won more NBA MVPs (six) than anyone else in history, also reiterated his viewpoint that the one-and-done rule is a “travesty” for college basketball.

“One-and-dones doesn’t make any sense to me,” he said. “To have somebody come and be on campus for six months and play a basketball season, what is that? … it’s not good for the college game and it hasn’t been good for the pro game. I think they better find a different way of dealing with those issues.”

There’s a sense that alterations will need to eventually come to both eligibility and draft rules. NBA commissioner Adam Silver has gone on record saying the league is considering ditching the one-and-done rule as early as next season.