Posts Tagged ‘Adam Silver’

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The Dallas Mavericks may be entering a full-on rebuild, but the franchise likely would’ve treated this year’s offseason much differently had it been in the Eastern Conference, according to team owner Mark Cuban.

“We’re rebuilding, and there’s no question about it,” Cuban told ESPN during Sunday’s summer league game. “If we were in the East, we would not be rebuilding. We’d be handling things completely different.”

After whiffing on several big-name free agents in recent years, the Mavericks have taken a less aggressive approach this offseason, with longtime power forward Dirk Nowitzki serving as the team’s lone free-agent signing.

“I think I’m going to kidnap Adam Silver and not let him out until he moves us to the Eastern Conference,” Cuban joked. “Given where we are, given where the Warriors are, and what’s happening in the Western Conference, it kind of sealed what we have to do.”

Cuban hasn’t been afraid to share his thoughts on the imbalance in the two conferences, recently suggesting that the league should consider tweaking the current playoff format to help solve the disparity.

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The NBA is in no hurry to address the issue of conference imbalance.

It was reported recently that multiple Western Conference team owners reached out to the league to propose ways to solve the power disparity, with their half of the league being so much stronger than the East.

It’s a problem the NBA has had for some time, and delved into two years ago only to find that abolishing conferences would be infeasible.

“We concluded that given all the focus on sports science, health of our players, impact of travel, it didn’t make sense, at least at this time, to move to a balanced schedule, because again, we play an imbalanced schedule,” commissioner Adam Silver said Wednesday at the Board of Governors presser, as quoted by ASAP Sports.

“Teams in the East obviously play each other more than teams in the West, and the notion is if you’re going to see one through 16, the only fair way to do it is then have a balanced schedule throughout the season.”

Silver explained that balancing out the schedule league-wide would necessitate far too much travel.

“The conclusion was that at least given the state of travel, the state of science on travel, we’re better off staying in the conference system the way we have it, and of course same implications for the playoffs; the notion, again, of having teams crisscrossing the country in the first round didn’t seem to make sense to our teams,” he added.

That said, the NBA isn’t ruling out the possibility of someday realigning conferences or changing the playoff format. In fact, Silver said he assumed the league will eventually look into it again.

“I think for the league, I think many of us felt a 1-through-16 playoff made more sense. And maybe there’s also the potential – it’s in some ways a separate issue, should you reseed after every round as some leagues do? I think those are the things we’ll continue to look at, but it’s not at the top of the agenda right now.”

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Basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar kept up his criticism of LaVar Ball on Friday, saying that the publicity-seeking hoops dad is cheapening the college game.

“Everybody knows about his sons because he has been able to hype them,” Abdul-Jabbar told Philadelphia radio station 97.5 The Fanatic. “But I don’t think that’s good for college basketball. It looks like it’s a huckster show. And that bothers me, you know. You have people going those lengths to promote their kids. I don’t get it.”

The 70-year-old Hall of Famer has been critical of Ball before, saying last month that he doesn’t think LaVar is doing his sons any good. Like Abdul-Jabbar, Lonzo Ball starred at UCLA and could also end up playing for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Abdul-Jabbar, who has won more NBA MVPs (six) than anyone else in history, also reiterated his viewpoint that the one-and-done rule is a “travesty” for college basketball.

“One-and-dones doesn’t make any sense to me,” he said. “To have somebody come and be on campus for six months and play a basketball season, what is that? … it’s not good for the college game and it hasn’t been good for the pro game. I think they better find a different way of dealing with those issues.”

There’s a sense that alterations will need to eventually come to both eligibility and draft rules. NBA commissioner Adam Silver has gone on record saying the league is considering ditching the one-and-done rule as early as next season.

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International expansion may not be in the NBA’s immediate plans, but it’s not unrealistic to believe that a franchise could end up in Mexico City down the road.

While commissioner Adam Silver made it clear that a move wouldn’t happen in the next few years, he did say the league is looking into adding a team further south.

“Mexico City, in terms of international markets, is one we’re looking more closely at,” Silver said Friday at MIT’s Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, according to Liz Bloom of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

The NBA has hosted five regular-season contests in Mexico City since the 1997-98 season, with the Phoenix Suns playing back-to-back games there earlier this year.

Silver also previously stated that he’s entertained the idea of organizing a midseason tournament in Mexico City, in hopes of increasing the NBA’s popularity in North America’s most populous city.

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MEXICO CITY – An NBA franchise in Mexico City? Not so fast.

A couple of days after the Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said that he was in favor of a team playing south of the border, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said Saturday that it will not happen, at least not in the immediate future.

Before the Mavericks beat the Phoenix Suns on Thursday night in Mexico City, Cuban said that a team in Mexico would help the sport while he praised the Arena Ciudad de Mexico and added that the distance from the United States isn’t a factor. Mexico City’s governor, Miguel Angel Mancera, has also said that he’s in favor of the idea.

”The next step before we start talking about a franchise in Mexico City is to bring more games here, and we have this two regular-season games and whether we bring additional regular-season games next season or do some sort of tournament with several teams playing each other, that is something that we are looking at,” Silver said a press conference before the Spurs and Suns took the court.

Including preseason, Mexico has hosted 24 NBA games since 1992, that’s more than any country besides the United States and Canada.

”In terms of a franchise here in Mexico City, it is something to look at,” Silver said. ”Obviously, it’s an incredible market with over 20 million people, the largest market in North America and, while we have no immediate plans to expand, one of the things that we look at, it’s whether expanding will be additive to the league as a whole and clearly coming to Mexico City, not just because the population of the city but as a gateway to the rest of Latin America could potentially be very important for the league.”

The game Saturday was fifth regular-season game in the country. Four of them have been played in Area Ciudad de Mexico, a glass-clad state of the art arena that was built in 2012 that hosts over 20,000 fans.

”As I said before there’s no market more important for us than Mexico, we already have discussions earlier today about bringing other games here,” Silver said. ”But ultimately it will make more sense to bring more teams rather than just have two teams play each other for a single event to maybe bring multiple teams and to have some sort of midseason tournament, sort of like a round-robin tournament.”

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The last time an NBA All-Star Game was held in the state of Indiana was during the 1984-85 season at the Hoosier Dome, with Houston Rockets big man Ralph Sampson taking home Most Valuable Player honors.

The NBA has already announced locations for its midseason exhibition through 2019 at the very least, with Indianapolis on commissioner Adam Silver’s radar as far as where the game could possibly be held after that.

“We are having conversations with the president team Rick Fuson and Jim Morris, along with Herb and Steve Simon,” Silver said when addressing the media in London on Thursday. “I know they are very interested. We’re still talking about some of the logistics in terms of exactly what year, and even maybe the possibility of playing in a larger arena.

“So, all those things need to be worked through, but I think it’s highly likely that we will return to Indianapolis for an All-Star Game in the near future.”

The All-Star Game will be held this year at Smoothie King Center in New Orleans, and then Staples Center in Los Angeles in 2018. The league is prioritizing giving the game back to Charlotte for 2019 if a resolution can be reached in terms of North Carolina’s controversial state laws concerning the LGBT community.

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NBA teams are already boycotting the hotel chain owned by President-elect Donald Trump, but commissioner Adam Silver doesn’t think they should take that boycott to the future Trump White House.

While there’s been some speculation about whether future NBA champs might boycott their subsequent White House visit in the wake of Trump’s election, Silver feels any player who chooses to do so will be forfeiting a unique opportunity to directly address their concerns to the most powerful man in the nation.

“To me, if a player were to choose not to go to the White House, whether they were choosing not to go to the current White House or a future White House, my response would be: ‘That’s a lost opportunity,'” Silver told The Undefeated’s Mike Wise. “Because that’s an opportunity that most citizens who have a political point of view would kill for – the opportunity to directly tell the president of the United States how they feel about an issue.

“Now, if the president were to say, ‘I have no interest in what members of the NBA think about an issue,’ that might surprise me and I might have a different response.”

The NBA champion White House visit is usually a light, good-natured, celebratory affair, so using it as a means of trying to change the president’s mind about something would represent a considerable tonal shift. And given how Trump has typically reacted to those who challenge or criticize him, there’s scant evidence that such an approach would be productive.

Still, though he says the choice is the players’ to make, Silver feels the potential positives of a White House visit would outweigh the potential negatives.

“The institution is bigger than any one man, whether that man be President Obama or President Trump,” Silver said. “Ultimately players have to make their own decisions. But if they were seeking my counsel, my counsel would be that they should go to the White House if offered the opportunity.”